Ho hum. Boehner's third version of debt ceiling bill passes the House

It was hard for me to get worked up over the supposed drama of the close vote in the House.  Speaker Boehner averted a serious humiliation when his third iteration of the two stage commission-laden debt ceiling bill passed the House 218 to 210, with 22 Republicans voting No.  

Establishment pundits like Charles Krauthammer assure conservatives they have won a victory, by turning the tide in the direction of spending cuts.  Tea Partiers grumble at the cosmic insignificance of the tiny percentage reduction in the planned rate of growth of the deficit.

Most depressing of all, the realization is spreading that, as Rush put it, we have been played. The next stop is the Senate, which will revise the bill to its liking, essentially Harry Reid's earlier version with a fig leaf for the GOP.  Then the House will be presented a fait accompli, with intense time pressure to do something. Very little of sustentative nature will change.

Politics as usual won. The Tea Party wants to change the way the game is played, thinking the unthinkable like closing whole departments of the federal government. The establishment conservatives counsel patience, until the time Congress and the Executive are united under Republican control.  

I wish Boehner had played hardball and gone to the American people over the Senate's bottling up of Cap, Cut & Balance. The GOP ashoudl ahve demanded they rewrite it and send it to conference committee.

I honor the GOP representatives who refused to play the game, via Politico:

 Justin Amash (Mich.)
Michele Bachmann (Minn.)
Chip Cravaack (Minn.)

Jason Chaffetz (Utah)
Scott Desjarlais (Tenn.)
Tom Graves (Ga.)
Tim Huelskamp (Kans.)
Steve King (Iowa)
Tim Johnson (Ill.)
Tom McClintock (Calif.)
Mick Mulvaney (S.C.)
Ron Paul (Texas)
Connie Mack (Fla.)
Jim Jordan (Ohio)
Tim Scott (S.C.)
Paul Broun (Ga.)
Tom Latham (Iowa)
Jeff Duncan (S.C.)
Trey Gowdy (S.C.)
Steve Southerland (Fla.)
Joe Walsh (Ill.)
Joe Wilson (S.C.)

 

It was hard for me to get worked up over the supposed drama of the close vote in the House.  Speaker Boehner averted a serious humiliation when his third iteration of the two stage commission-laden debt ceiling bill passed the House 218 to 210, with 22 Republicans voting No.  

Establishment pundits like Charles Krauthammer assure conservatives they have won a victory, by turning the tide in the direction of spending cuts.  Tea Partiers grumble at the cosmic insignificance of the tiny percentage reduction in the planned rate of growth of the deficit.

Most depressing of all, the realization is spreading that, as Rush put it, we have been played. The next stop is the Senate, which will revise the bill to its liking, essentially Harry Reid's earlier version with a fig leaf for the GOP.  Then the House will be presented a fait accompli, with intense time pressure to do something. Very little of sustentative nature will change.

Politics as usual won. The Tea Party wants to change the way the game is played, thinking the unthinkable like closing whole departments of the federal government. The establishment conservatives counsel patience, until the time Congress and the Executive are united under Republican control.  

I wish Boehner had played hardball and gone to the American people over the Senate's bottling up of Cap, Cut & Balance. The GOP ashoudl ahve demanded they rewrite it and send it to conference committee.

I honor the GOP representatives who refused to play the game, via Politico:

 Justin Amash (Mich.)
Michele Bachmann (Minn.)
Chip Cravaack (Minn.)

Jason Chaffetz (Utah)
Scott Desjarlais (Tenn.)
Tom Graves (Ga.)
Tim Huelskamp (Kans.)
Steve King (Iowa)
Tim Johnson (Ill.)
Tom McClintock (Calif.)
Mick Mulvaney (S.C.)
Ron Paul (Texas)
Connie Mack (Fla.)
Jim Jordan (Ohio)
Tim Scott (S.C.)
Paul Broun (Ga.)
Tom Latham (Iowa)
Jeff Duncan (S.C.)
Trey Gowdy (S.C.)
Steve Southerland (Fla.)
Joe Walsh (Ill.)
Joe Wilson (S.C.)

 

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