Gaddafi wants more talks with US

Rick Moran
Muammar Gaddafi is open to conducting additional negotiations with the United States and the rebels but still insists he will not relinquish power.

Reuters:

Moussa Ibrahim said Libyan officials had a "productive dialogue" with U.S. counterparts last week in a rare meeting that followed American recognition of the rebel government that hopes to end Gaddafi's 41-year rule.

"Other meetings in the future ... will help solve Libyan problems," the spokesman told reporters in Tripoli late on Friday. "We are willing to talk to the Americans more."

He said Gaddafi would not leave his position nor Libya.

Hours later NATO planes bombed targets in the capital, causing damage and casualties, Libyan state television said, without giving details.

NATO said it had hit a "command and control node."

A Reuters witness heard at least six blasts early on Saturday, the largest to hit the capital in several weeks, four of them shaking the hotel hosting international media.

Rebel leader Mustafa Abdel Jalil said Gaddafi must agree publicly to stand down before any talks could begin.

Little discussed in the western press is the humanitarian disaster NATO has unleashed on this impoverished country. There are tens of thousands of refugees, thousands injured with inadequate medical attention, and the economy has come to a near standstill. Libya will be years rebuilding - and that's with generous aid from the west.

At this point, whether Gaddafi stays or goes matters little. The Libyan people will suffer no matter who sits on the throne in Tripoli.


Muammar Gaddafi is open to conducting additional negotiations with the United States and the rebels but still insists he will not relinquish power.

Reuters:

Moussa Ibrahim said Libyan officials had a "productive dialogue" with U.S. counterparts last week in a rare meeting that followed American recognition of the rebel government that hopes to end Gaddafi's 41-year rule.

"Other meetings in the future ... will help solve Libyan problems," the spokesman told reporters in Tripoli late on Friday. "We are willing to talk to the Americans more."

He said Gaddafi would not leave his position nor Libya.

Hours later NATO planes bombed targets in the capital, causing damage and casualties, Libyan state television said, without giving details.

NATO said it had hit a "command and control node."

A Reuters witness heard at least six blasts early on Saturday, the largest to hit the capital in several weeks, four of them shaking the hotel hosting international media.

Rebel leader Mustafa Abdel Jalil said Gaddafi must agree publicly to stand down before any talks could begin.

Little discussed in the western press is the humanitarian disaster NATO has unleashed on this impoverished country. There are tens of thousands of refugees, thousands injured with inadequate medical attention, and the economy has come to a near standstill. Libya will be years rebuilding - and that's with generous aid from the west.

At this point, whether Gaddafi stays or goes matters little. The Libyan people will suffer no matter who sits on the throne in Tripoli.