Weiner reported to be resigning (update: he's gone)

Update: in a Brooklyn press conference marked by heckling, Weiner bade farewell to office -- for now. He left open the door to future public service (it is a mark of the man's degradation of the public discourse that even this conventional phraase takes on off color overtones), meaning, I suppose, that he could run in 2012, as a recovered and wiser man. Oh brother!

Some interesting analysis from former Congressman Artur Davis (via Politico):

Weiner learned a brutal set of lessons about the chemistry of Washington politics. First, rank-and-file House members are expendable: the House is not the club that is the Senate, where personal relationships are more durable and there is an institutional aversion to pushing a member out. Second, unlike Charlie Rangel, Weiner had no race card to play. Finally, the Bill Clinton rule of survival applies best to second-term presidents with 65 percent approval ratings and a track record of 7.5 percent GDP growth.

And of course, Weiner got caught not only lying but doing it with gusto and indignation. False allegations do happen in politics, and it does not take much for baseless rumors to spread. Weiner has just complicated the task of any public figure who denies an allegation and for that reason alone, this saga has contributed to the cynicism around political life.

Finally, there is no long-term consequence. The informal caucus of congressmen and senators who cheat, flirt or make inappropriate comments to women of any age has not been dented by Weiner's fall. The exposure rate will continue to turn on arbitrary and unwritten rules, and the sin rate will remain thoroughly bipartisan.

 

Democrats are breathing a sigh of relief, as Politico and others are reporting that Anthony Weiner will resign his office. Fox News reports that he has scheduled a news conference for 2 PM today in his NY district.

Although most media and Democrats are emphasizing the sexual component of Weiner's transgression, his immediate and extended use of lies, and blaming his political opponents as a tactic when caught in misbehavior is the most important aspect of the story, and the feature with the greatest political implication for other Democrats, many of whom initially expressed support for Weiner's twisted version of reality.

Debbie Wasserman Schultz, who has been giving many gifts to Republicans lately, knew enough to keep her mouth shut:

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.), who chairs the Democratic National Committee, said she had no comment about the resignation and only knew what she read on her BlackBerry.

 

Update: in a Brooklyn press conference marked by heckling, Weiner bade farewell to office -- for now. He left open the door to future public service (it is a mark of the man's degradation of the public discourse that even this conventional phraase takes on off color overtones), meaning, I suppose, that he could run in 2012, as a recovered and wiser man. Oh brother!

Some interesting analysis from former Congressman Artur Davis (via Politico):

Weiner learned a brutal set of lessons about the chemistry of Washington politics. First, rank-and-file House members are expendable: the House is not the club that is the Senate, where personal relationships are more durable and there is an institutional aversion to pushing a member out. Second, unlike Charlie Rangel, Weiner had no race card to play. Finally, the Bill Clinton rule of survival applies best to second-term presidents with 65 percent approval ratings and a track record of 7.5 percent GDP growth.

And of course, Weiner got caught not only lying but doing it with gusto and indignation. False allegations do happen in politics, and it does not take much for baseless rumors to spread. Weiner has just complicated the task of any public figure who denies an allegation and for that reason alone, this saga has contributed to the cynicism around political life.

Finally, there is no long-term consequence. The informal caucus of congressmen and senators who cheat, flirt or make inappropriate comments to women of any age has not been dented by Weiner's fall. The exposure rate will continue to turn on arbitrary and unwritten rules, and the sin rate will remain thoroughly bipartisan.

 

Democrats are breathing a sigh of relief, as Politico and others are reporting that Anthony Weiner will resign his office. Fox News reports that he has scheduled a news conference for 2 PM today in his NY district.

Although most media and Democrats are emphasizing the sexual component of Weiner's transgression, his immediate and extended use of lies, and blaming his political opponents as a tactic when caught in misbehavior is the most important aspect of the story, and the feature with the greatest political implication for other Democrats, many of whom initially expressed support for Weiner's twisted version of reality.

Debbie Wasserman Schultz, who has been giving many gifts to Republicans lately, knew enough to keep her mouth shut:

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.), who chairs the Democratic National Committee, said she had no comment about the resignation and only knew what she read on her BlackBerry.

 

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