Unions 'off Target' at Apple, too

Thomas Lifson
The union movement in the United States is declining in popularity, as Americans see them responsible for the sending formerly great corporations into decline and bankruptcy, in a short sighted grab for money and restrictive work rules that hobble competitiveness. Brendon Peck's article on Target and Walmart has a counterpart in one of the hippest retail chains in America: Apple Stores. The Yahoo Finance Daily Ticker tells the story of an attempt to unionize Apple Store employees, and asks readers to comment.

The comments are quite fascinating, and do not for the most part treat unions as a good thing.  Gone are the days when people assumed companies would always be there to provide jobs, no matter how much money and how restrictive work rules unions were able to demand. The world of high technology is fluid, and today's success story is tomorrow's has-been. Competition rules.

Hat tip: Cliff Thier

The union movement in the United States is declining in popularity, as Americans see them responsible for the sending formerly great corporations into decline and bankruptcy, in a short sighted grab for money and restrictive work rules that hobble competitiveness. Brendon Peck's article on Target and Walmart has a counterpart in one of the hippest retail chains in America: Apple Stores. The Yahoo Finance Daily Ticker tells the story of an attempt to unionize Apple Store employees, and asks readers to comment.

The comments are quite fascinating, and do not for the most part treat unions as a good thing.  Gone are the days when people assumed companies would always be there to provide jobs, no matter how much money and how restrictive work rules unions were able to demand. The world of high technology is fluid, and today's success story is tomorrow's has-been. Competition rules.

Hat tip: Cliff Thier