Obama sides with Argentina, against Britain, in Falklands dispute

After visiting London last week and touting the "special relationship" between Great Britain and the US, the US decided to spit in the Brits face by joining an Organization of American States resolution calling for the two sides to "negotiate" the island chain's sovereignty.

Britain does not recognize a question of sovereignty regarding the islands, having fought a war in 1982 with Argentina to decide that question. At that time, the US stood steadfastly behind Thatcher's England despite most of the world lining up on Argentina's side.

Now it appears that our "special relationship" actually means zero. Fox News:

Noting that President Obama just returned from a visit to London where he cited the U.S.-U.K. "special relationship," Heritage Foundation analyst Nile Gardiner said the U.S. should at least stay neutral on the Falkland issue.

"British sovereignty over the islands is not an issue for negotiation. ... This is a slap in the face for America's closest friend and ally," he said, accusing the administration of siding with Venezuela and others against its friend.

"This is a bizarre foreign policy," he added. Gardiner is the director of the Margaret Thatcher Center for Freedom, whose namesake was prime minister during the Falklands War.

The Obama administration made clear in early 2010 that it would endorse calls for talks over the islands. At a Buenos Aires news conference with Argentina's president in March 2010, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said she agreed with Argentina that the two nations should "sit down and resolve the issues between them."

From there, the U.S. implicitly backed an OAS document calling for talks last June and again Tuesday at a conference in El Salvador. The latest declaration, which refers to the islands as the Malvinas Islands, calls for exploring "all possible avenues towards a peaceful settlement of the dispute" and resuming sovereignty negotiations "as soon as possible."

The islanders are perfectly happy as British citizens and enjoy a booming economy in fisheries and tourism. The Brits have administererd the island since the 1830's and if possession is 9/10ths of the law, England has the advantage hands down.

But with the advent of the Obama administration, Argentina has renewed its sovereignty claims. No doubt they knew that Obama would favor them in a dispute against the British - a nation the president has humiliated several times since taking office.





After visiting London last week and touting the "special relationship" between Great Britain and the US, the US decided to spit in the Brits face by joining an Organization of American States resolution calling for the two sides to "negotiate" the island chain's sovereignty.

Britain does not recognize a question of sovereignty regarding the islands, having fought a war in 1982 with Argentina to decide that question. At that time, the US stood steadfastly behind Thatcher's England despite most of the world lining up on Argentina's side.

Now it appears that our "special relationship" actually means zero. Fox News:

Noting that President Obama just returned from a visit to London where he cited the U.S.-U.K. "special relationship," Heritage Foundation analyst Nile Gardiner said the U.S. should at least stay neutral on the Falkland issue.

"British sovereignty over the islands is not an issue for negotiation. ... This is a slap in the face for America's closest friend and ally," he said, accusing the administration of siding with Venezuela and others against its friend.

"This is a bizarre foreign policy," he added. Gardiner is the director of the Margaret Thatcher Center for Freedom, whose namesake was prime minister during the Falklands War.

The Obama administration made clear in early 2010 that it would endorse calls for talks over the islands. At a Buenos Aires news conference with Argentina's president in March 2010, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said she agreed with Argentina that the two nations should "sit down and resolve the issues between them."

From there, the U.S. implicitly backed an OAS document calling for talks last June and again Tuesday at a conference in El Salvador. The latest declaration, which refers to the islands as the Malvinas Islands, calls for exploring "all possible avenues towards a peaceful settlement of the dispute" and resuming sovereignty negotiations "as soon as possible."

The islanders are perfectly happy as British citizens and enjoy a booming economy in fisheries and tourism. The Brits have administererd the island since the 1830's and if possession is 9/10ths of the law, England has the advantage hands down.

But with the advent of the Obama administration, Argentina has renewed its sovereignty claims. No doubt they knew that Obama would favor them in a dispute against the British - a nation the president has humiliated several times since taking office.





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