Palin swarmed at 'Rolling Thunder' rally

Those who are familiar with my writings elsewhere know that I have no great love for Sarah Palin. But no matter what you think of her, there is little doubt that she has unerring political instincts that would make her a formidable candidate for president.

Yesterday, she made a stop at the Rolling Thunder motorcycle rally for vets and was immediately swarmed by press and fans - to the point that some of the bikers became agitated about the feeding frenzy and pushed around a few of the press.

Politico:

Palin arrived with Willow on the front of the motorcycle she was driving and her husband, Todd, and oldest daughter, Bristol, on separate bikes. Still, their presence was very small in comparison to the rest of the rally, drawing about 200 people in a swarm around them at an event that drew thousands of veterans. Her husband, wearing a navy blue T-shirt with "Washington, D.C." printed on the front, worked the crowd with ease - offering fast and short responses to a few reporters and glad-handing the many fans of his wife. They talked happily with those within shouting distance, and they joined the former vice presidential nominee in signing leather vests, posing for the cameras and answering questions to the few reporters who got close enough. She even held a brief availability with reporters in the corner of the parking lot away from the main group.Organizers of the annual veterans motorcycle ride were clearly frustrated by the media attention and fuss brought by Palin, and the bikers weren't as encouraging as the Palins. Yelling, and in a few instances, shoving, they tried to keep away press trying to snap photographs or capture a rare quote.

Ted Shpak, the national legislative director for Rolling Thunder, didn't take kindly to reporters approaching the Palin swarm. "This is our run, back up," he shouted.

To make Rolling Thunder the first stop on her bus tour demonstrates a pitch perfect sense of her base of support. The bikers are mostly middle class, God-fearing patriots who are among those hardest hit by the Obama economy. And while there are some who no doubt believed she was trying to upstage the rally itself, she proved that not to be the case - but gained massive attention for her appearance anyway.

She already has the press wondering where she will show up next. By not giving much advance notice, she is proving she doesn't need huge crowds to get her message out. The media is doing a fine job acting as a megaphone. She also proved that she doesn't have to make a speech to get 1st class media attention.

What this all adds up to is that Palin may indeed have decided to run. Her tour of historic sites - unnamed as yet - will make splendid backdrops for her appearances, tying her to our past as well as pointing the way to the future.

How about a formal announcement in New Hampshire on the 4th of July?




Those who are familiar with my writings elsewhere know that I have no great love for Sarah Palin. But no matter what you think of her, there is little doubt that she has unerring political instincts that would make her a formidable candidate for president.

Yesterday, she made a stop at the Rolling Thunder motorcycle rally for vets and was immediately swarmed by press and fans - to the point that some of the bikers became agitated about the feeding frenzy and pushed around a few of the press.

Politico:

Palin arrived with Willow on the front of the motorcycle she was driving and her husband, Todd, and oldest daughter, Bristol, on separate bikes. Still, their presence was very small in comparison to the rest of the rally, drawing about 200 people in a swarm around them at an event that drew thousands of veterans. Her husband, wearing a navy blue T-shirt with "Washington, D.C." printed on the front, worked the crowd with ease - offering fast and short responses to a few reporters and glad-handing the many fans of his wife. They talked happily with those within shouting distance, and they joined the former vice presidential nominee in signing leather vests, posing for the cameras and answering questions to the few reporters who got close enough. She even held a brief availability with reporters in the corner of the parking lot away from the main group.

Organizers of the annual veterans motorcycle ride were clearly frustrated by the media attention and fuss brought by Palin, and the bikers weren't as encouraging as the Palins. Yelling, and in a few instances, shoving, they tried to keep away press trying to snap photographs or capture a rare quote.

Ted Shpak, the national legislative director for Rolling Thunder, didn't take kindly to reporters approaching the Palin swarm. "This is our run, back up," he shouted.

To make Rolling Thunder the first stop on her bus tour demonstrates a pitch perfect sense of her base of support. The bikers are mostly middle class, God-fearing patriots who are among those hardest hit by the Obama economy. And while there are some who no doubt believed she was trying to upstage the rally itself, she proved that not to be the case - but gained massive attention for her appearance anyway.

She already has the press wondering where she will show up next. By not giving much advance notice, she is proving she doesn't need huge crowds to get her message out. The media is doing a fine job acting as a megaphone. She also proved that she doesn't have to make a speech to get 1st class media attention.

What this all adds up to is that Palin may indeed have decided to run. Her tour of historic sites - unnamed as yet - will make splendid backdrops for her appearances, tying her to our past as well as pointing the way to the future.

How about a formal announcement in New Hampshire on the 4th of July?




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