Pakistan braces for terrorist onslaught from Taliban and other extremists

Rick Moran
While it may be true that elements in the Pakistani military and intelligence services assisted in hiding Osama bin Laden and also supports the Afghanistan Taliban, the deadly Pakistani version of the Taliban is likely to massively increase terrorism in the country in response to the killing of bin Laden.

Pakistan's English language news portal Dawn:


The Pakistani Taliban threatened attacks against government leaders, including President Asif Ali Zardari, the Pakistan army and the United States on Monday, after the killing of Osama bin Laden in the country."Now Pakistani rulers, President Zardari and the army will be our first targets. America will be our second target," Ehsanullah Ehsan, a spokesman for Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), or Taliban Movement of Pakistan, told Reuters by telephone from an undisclosed location.

Blogger Badar Alam of Dawn points out some more fallout from the operation:

Lastly, post-bin Laden, terrorism may enter a new, even more uncertain, phase in Pakistan. There may be an immediate ‘reaction' from bin Laden's supporters among the Pakistani Taliban as well as other religious and sectarian militant groups in the shape of suicide bombings and other attacks against the symbols of state, security and government in Pakistan as well as against civilian targets in the urban areas.

More alarmingly, there may emerge some new individuals and groups - so far unknown - who may take up bin Laden's cause and increase terrorist activity in Pakistan in particular and across the globe in general. After all, this is what we witnessed in the wake of military operation on Islamabad's Lal Masjid in 2007 - an incident that raised the level of terrorist incident and their lethality to unprecedented levels, courtesy new groups of militants and terrorists either led by the masjid's follower or inspired by the reports of perceived military brutalities there.

In this scenario, Pakistan must brace for more difficult, more uncertain and more turbulent times.




While it may be true that elements in the Pakistani military and intelligence services assisted in hiding Osama bin Laden and also supports the Afghanistan Taliban, the deadly Pakistani version of the Taliban is likely to massively increase terrorism in the country in response to the killing of bin Laden.

Pakistan's English language news portal Dawn:


The Pakistani Taliban threatened attacks against government leaders, including President Asif Ali Zardari, the Pakistan army and the United States on Monday, after the killing of Osama bin Laden in the country.

"Now Pakistani rulers, President Zardari and the army will be our first targets. America will be our second target," Ehsanullah Ehsan, a spokesman for Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), or Taliban Movement of Pakistan, told Reuters by telephone from an undisclosed location.

Blogger Badar Alam of Dawn points out some more fallout from the operation:

Lastly, post-bin Laden, terrorism may enter a new, even more uncertain, phase in Pakistan. There may be an immediate ‘reaction' from bin Laden's supporters among the Pakistani Taliban as well as other religious and sectarian militant groups in the shape of suicide bombings and other attacks against the symbols of state, security and government in Pakistan as well as against civilian targets in the urban areas.

More alarmingly, there may emerge some new individuals and groups - so far unknown - who may take up bin Laden's cause and increase terrorist activity in Pakistan in particular and across the globe in general. After all, this is what we witnessed in the wake of military operation on Islamabad's Lal Masjid in 2007 - an incident that raised the level of terrorist incident and their lethality to unprecedented levels, courtesy new groups of militants and terrorists either led by the masjid's follower or inspired by the reports of perceived military brutalities there.

In this scenario, Pakistan must brace for more difficult, more uncertain and more turbulent times.