Mitt's top NH supporter deserts

Rick Moran
Mitt Romney's New Hampshire organization was rocked with the news that the candidate's top supporter in the state will no longer support him.

CNN:

The man who chaired Mitt Romney's 2008 campaign in New Hampshire won't be helping the former Massachusetts governor when he mounts a second bid for the White House.Bruce Keough, a Dublin businessman and former state senator, told Mother Jones magazine that he's looking at Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels or Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty instead.

Why? He thinks Romney has shifted his positions too many times over the years.

"I don't think the voters are looking for somebody who's going to be recasting himself," Keough told the magazine. "They want somebody who's been true to a certain set of political ideals for a while."

Romney maintains a strong base of support in New Hampshire from his last campaign and leads his potential GOP rivals in state polls.

But Keough said that Romney "manages to say things that cause people to think, 'Wait a second: I thought I knew him, and now I'm not so sure.' I think he can be successful. But I don't think he will be successful if he runs his campaign like he did in 2008."

He isn't the only New Hampshire GOP strategist to change teams for 2012: Former Romney adviser Rich Killion signed on with Pawlenty earlier this year.

Romney is still ahead in New Hampshire by virtue of his name recognition and deep organization. But this can't be good news for a candidate who is wallowing in the low 20's in national polls and can't even surpass Donald Trump.



Mitt Romney's New Hampshire organization was rocked with the news that the candidate's top supporter in the state will no longer support him.

CNN:

The man who chaired Mitt Romney's 2008 campaign in New Hampshire won't be helping the former Massachusetts governor when he mounts a second bid for the White House.

Bruce Keough, a Dublin businessman and former state senator, told Mother Jones magazine that he's looking at Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels or Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty instead.

Why? He thinks Romney has shifted his positions too many times over the years.

"I don't think the voters are looking for somebody who's going to be recasting himself," Keough told the magazine. "They want somebody who's been true to a certain set of political ideals for a while."

Romney maintains a strong base of support in New Hampshire from his last campaign and leads his potential GOP rivals in state polls.

But Keough said that Romney "manages to say things that cause people to think, 'Wait a second: I thought I knew him, and now I'm not so sure.' I think he can be successful. But I don't think he will be successful if he runs his campaign like he did in 2008."

He isn't the only New Hampshire GOP strategist to change teams for 2012: Former Romney adviser Rich Killion signed on with Pawlenty earlier this year.

Romney is still ahead in New Hampshire by virtue of his name recognition and deep organization. But this can't be good news for a candidate who is wallowing in the low 20's in national polls and can't even surpass Donald Trump.