3rd time's the charm; Saleh to give up power

Yemen's strongman President Ali Abdullah Saleh is scheduled to sign the instrument of his resignation today, agreeing to leave power in 30 days in exchange for immunity from prosecution.

Reuters:

Yemen's President Ali Abdullah Saleh was due to sign a pact on Sunday to become the third Arab leader ousted this year by protests, under stronger diplomatic pressure this time after twice backing out at the last minute.Hundreds of Saleh loyalists blocked roads to protest against the deal, piling stones in streets as makeshift barriers and blocking cars, while across town anti-Saleh protests that have continued for three months drew tens of thousands of people.

More than 170 protesters have been killed in a crackdown on demonstrations demanding an end to Saleh's 30 year rule, part of the wave of uprisings across North Africa and the Middle East that swept aside the leaders of Tunisia and Egypt.

Gulf neighbors, anxious to prevent the Arab world's poorest country from slipping into anarchy, have negotiated a deal to ease Saleh out of power within 30 days, with a promise of immunity from prosecution. The opposition signed it on Saturday.

Yemen is in chaos and terrorists like al-Qaeda of the Arabian Peninsula have taken advantage of the lack of law and order to set up safe zones in both the north and the south. The new government will have their hands full reclaiming that territory - if it can be done at all.

Another consequence of the "Arab Spring."



Yemen's strongman President Ali Abdullah Saleh is scheduled to sign the instrument of his resignation today, agreeing to leave power in 30 days in exchange for immunity from prosecution.

Reuters:

Yemen's President Ali Abdullah Saleh was due to sign a pact on Sunday to become the third Arab leader ousted this year by protests, under stronger diplomatic pressure this time after twice backing out at the last minute.

Hundreds of Saleh loyalists blocked roads to protest against the deal, piling stones in streets as makeshift barriers and blocking cars, while across town anti-Saleh protests that have continued for three months drew tens of thousands of people.

More than 170 protesters have been killed in a crackdown on demonstrations demanding an end to Saleh's 30 year rule, part of the wave of uprisings across North Africa and the Middle East that swept aside the leaders of Tunisia and Egypt.

Gulf neighbors, anxious to prevent the Arab world's poorest country from slipping into anarchy, have negotiated a deal to ease Saleh out of power within 30 days, with a promise of immunity from prosecution. The opposition signed it on Saturday.

Yemen is in chaos and terrorists like al-Qaeda of the Arabian Peninsula have taken advantage of the lack of law and order to set up safe zones in both the north and the south. The new government will have their hands full reclaiming that territory - if it can be done at all.

Another consequence of the "Arab Spring."



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