Why Trump Is Surging in New Hampshire

According to a most recent poll, the unlikely Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has surged into second place in New Hampshire.  His 21 percent support trails only Mitt Romney's 26 percent and easily tops the 12 percent registered by Newt Gingrich and Mike Huckabee.

It was Huckabee's weak-kneed performance in the face of the "birther" questions that induced me to write on March 4, "In the Republican spirit of free enterprise, I would recommend my new book, Deconstructing Obama . . . . The first Republican candidate to educate himself on this issue, and to turn the tables on his tormentors, will likely be the next president of the United States."

Little did I expect that candidate to be Donald Trump, but he has done exactly as I had hoped, and, better yet, he has pulled his talking points from my book.

There are, of course, any number of sources Trump could have drawn from on the question of Obama's manufactured nativity story.  On two other key points, however, Trump clearly drew his inspiration from Deconstructing Obama.

Most notably, as Trump told Laura Ingraham and others, former terrorist Bill Ayers wrote the Obama memoir, Dreams from My Father, which Trump correctly identifies as the foundation of Obama's "genius" myth.

Of note, too, Trump was the first public figure to draw a distinction between the lyrical Dreams and Obama's workman-like second book, The Audacity of Hope, published in 2006.  Trump even hinted at its likely author, referring to Obama's wunderkind speechwriter, Jon Favreau, as "a guy that's like a sophomore in high school."

Forgive my insistence on the subject of Obama's legitimacy, and my own role therein, but I continue to face stiff resistance from the more respectable corners of the conservative media, as has anyone who has dared question the official Obama orthodoxy.
This is all a "distraction," we are told, an "irrelevance" even.  Distraction or not, Donald Trump's surge has surely proved the subject's relevance.
According to a most recent poll, the unlikely Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has surged into second place in New Hampshire.  His 21 percent support trails only Mitt Romney's 26 percent and easily tops the 12 percent registered by Newt Gingrich and Mike Huckabee.

It was Huckabee's weak-kneed performance in the face of the "birther" questions that induced me to write on March 4, "In the Republican spirit of free enterprise, I would recommend my new book, Deconstructing Obama . . . . The first Republican candidate to educate himself on this issue, and to turn the tables on his tormentors, will likely be the next president of the United States."

Little did I expect that candidate to be Donald Trump, but he has done exactly as I had hoped, and, better yet, he has pulled his talking points from my book.

There are, of course, any number of sources Trump could have drawn from on the question of Obama's manufactured nativity story.  On two other key points, however, Trump clearly drew his inspiration from Deconstructing Obama.

Most notably, as Trump told Laura Ingraham and others, former terrorist Bill Ayers wrote the Obama memoir, Dreams from My Father, which Trump correctly identifies as the foundation of Obama's "genius" myth.

Of note, too, Trump was the first public figure to draw a distinction between the lyrical Dreams and Obama's workman-like second book, The Audacity of Hope, published in 2006.  Trump even hinted at its likely author, referring to Obama's wunderkind speechwriter, Jon Favreau, as "a guy that's like a sophomore in high school."

Forgive my insistence on the subject of Obama's legitimacy, and my own role therein, but I continue to face stiff resistance from the more respectable corners of the conservative media, as has anyone who has dared question the official Obama orthodoxy.
This is all a "distraction," we are told, an "irrelevance" even.  Distraction or not, Donald Trump's surge has surely proved the subject's relevance.

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