Tax Policy Expert Bruce Springsteen Criticizes Gov. Christie

The Los Angeles Times reports that Bruce Springsteen has written a letter to his local New Jersey newspaper criticizing the policies of his state's budget cutting Governor.

In a letter to his hometown newspaper, legendary rocker and Garden State icon Bruce Springsteen laments its recent report about how the state was slashing programs that help its poorest citizens while sparing more affluent residents from the budget axe.

"The article is one of the few that highlights the contradictions between a policy of large tax cuts, on the one hand, and cuts in services to those in the most dire conditions, on the other," Springsteen writes to the editors of the Asbury Park Press.


That's very righteous of rocker Springsteen, but meanwhile, back in February of this year, Fox News reported that Springsteen (also his former drummer Max Weinberg and Jon Bon Jovi) have taken advantage of New Jersey's tax laws to significantly cut their taxes on country properties by producing a minimum threshold of $500 a year's worth of farm products.

Fox stated, both in a video report and an article, that Springsteen's "Cadillac Ranch." According to Fox reporter Barbara Nevins Taylor:


Springsteen pays more than $138,000 a year in taxes on his three-acre Colts Neck home, but just $4,639 on the adjoining 200 acres, which is organically farmed and has horses, according to the report.

Just $4, 639 in taxes on 200 acres? Looks like Bruce's image as a working class hero is "Going Down," to quote from one of his famous song titles. Springsteen's accusation has been unable to "throw that speedball" by Fox News and probably Governor Christie like Bruce's buddy could in his "Glory Days."

Hey, Bruce, did you ever think that if these faux farmers in New Jersey had paid their fair share of taxes, the working guys and gals of Newark and Hoboken who made up the difference in the state budget would have had enough spare money to buy the Fords made in that Metuchen plant you sing about in "Glory Days" -- and it might have stayed open?

Liberals often twist Jesus's famous words around and cast the first stone to claim that they are without sin. But for Bruce Springsteen, this does not look like "
A Brilliant Disguise."
The Los Angeles Times reports that Bruce Springsteen has written a letter to his local New Jersey newspaper criticizing the policies of his state's budget cutting Governor.

In a letter to his hometown newspaper, legendary rocker and Garden State icon Bruce Springsteen laments its recent report about how the state was slashing programs that help its poorest citizens while sparing more affluent residents from the budget axe.

"The article is one of the few that highlights the contradictions between a policy of large tax cuts, on the one hand, and cuts in services to those in the most dire conditions, on the other," Springsteen writes to the editors of the Asbury Park Press.


That's very righteous of rocker Springsteen, but meanwhile, back in February of this year, Fox News reported that Springsteen (also his former drummer Max Weinberg and Jon Bon Jovi) have taken advantage of New Jersey's tax laws to significantly cut their taxes on country properties by producing a minimum threshold of $500 a year's worth of farm products.

Fox stated, both in a video report and an article, that Springsteen's "Cadillac Ranch." According to Fox reporter Barbara Nevins Taylor:


Springsteen pays more than $138,000 a year in taxes on his three-acre Colts Neck home, but just $4,639 on the adjoining 200 acres, which is organically farmed and has horses, according to the report.

Just $4, 639 in taxes on 200 acres? Looks like Bruce's image as a working class hero is "Going Down," to quote from one of his famous song titles. Springsteen's accusation has been unable to "throw that speedball" by Fox News and probably Governor Christie like Bruce's buddy could in his "Glory Days."

Hey, Bruce, did you ever think that if these faux farmers in New Jersey had paid their fair share of taxes, the working guys and gals of Newark and Hoboken who made up the difference in the state budget would have had enough spare money to buy the Fords made in that Metuchen plant you sing about in "Glory Days" -- and it might have stayed open?

Liberals often twist Jesus's famous words around and cast the first stone to claim that they are without sin. But for Bruce Springsteen, this does not look like "
A Brilliant Disguise."

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