Lara Logan Speaks Out on Her Rape

Breaking her silence, Lara Logan (aptly) categorizes her own 2/11/11 "sexual assault" by some 200 to 300 Egyptian democracy advocates as a merciless, extended rape.

For an extended period of time, they raped me with their hands...My clothes were torn to pieces...What really struck me was how merciless they were. They really enjoyed my pain and suffering. It incited them to more violence.

Ms. Logan also acknowledges her own ignorance of the violent misogyny characteristic of Egyptian society, noting:

I would have paid more attention to it if I had had any sense of it..When women are harassed and subjected to this in society, they're denied an equal place in that society. Public spaces don't belong to them. Men control it. It reaffirms the oppressive role of men in the society.

Logan concludes with a chilling anecdote which illuminates the  rape culture endemic in Egypt, and her relative good fortune:

Among the letters she received, she said, was one from a woman who lives in Canada who was raped in the back of a taxi in Cairo in early February, amid the protests there. "That poor woman had to go into the airport begging people to help her," Ms. Logan recalled. When she returned home, "her family told her not to talk about it." Ms. Logan said that as she read the letter, she started to sob. "It was a reminder to me of how fortunate I was," she said.

But at least in this 4/28/11 NY Times story, which previews a pending 60 Minutes interview, she apparently makes no comment about the reported Jew-hating taunts (Logan is not a Jew) of her attackers.
Breaking her silence, Lara Logan (aptly) categorizes her own 2/11/11 "sexual assault" by some 200 to 300 Egyptian democracy advocates as a merciless, extended rape.

For an extended period of time, they raped me with their hands...My clothes were torn to pieces...What really struck me was how merciless they were. They really enjoyed my pain and suffering. It incited them to more violence.

Ms. Logan also acknowledges her own ignorance of the violent misogyny characteristic of Egyptian society, noting:

I would have paid more attention to it if I had had any sense of it..When women are harassed and subjected to this in society, they're denied an equal place in that society. Public spaces don't belong to them. Men control it. It reaffirms the oppressive role of men in the society.

Logan concludes with a chilling anecdote which illuminates the  rape culture endemic in Egypt, and her relative good fortune:

Among the letters she received, she said, was one from a woman who lives in Canada who was raped in the back of a taxi in Cairo in early February, amid the protests there. "That poor woman had to go into the airport begging people to help her," Ms. Logan recalled. When she returned home, "her family told her not to talk about it." Ms. Logan said that as she read the letter, she started to sob. "It was a reminder to me of how fortunate I was," she said.

But at least in this 4/28/11 NY Times story, which previews a pending 60 Minutes interview, she apparently makes no comment about the reported Jew-hating taunts (Logan is not a Jew) of her attackers.

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