Egypt draws closer to Iran, Hamas

Rick Moran
Exactly the opposite of what we have been hearing from the administration. Ain't democracy grand?

New York Times:


Egyptian officials, emboldened by the revolution and with an eye on coming elections, say that they are moving toward policies that more accurately reflect public opinion. In the process they are seeking to reclaim the influence over the region that waned as their country became a predictable ally of Washington and the Israelis in the years since the 1979 peace treaty with Israel.The first major display of this new tack was the deal Egypt brokered Wednesday to reconcile the secular Palestinian party Fatah with its rival Hamas. "We are opening a new page," said Ambassador Menha Bakhoum, spokeswoman for the Foreign Ministry. "Egypt is resuming its role that was once abdicated."

Egypt's shifts are likely to alter the balance of power in the region, allowing Iran new access to a previously implacable foe and creating distance between itself and Israel, which has been watching the changes with some alarm. "We are troubled by some of the recent actions coming out of Egypt," said one senior Israeli official, citing a "rapprochement between Iran and Egypt" as well as "an upgrading of the relationship between Egypt and Hamas."

"These developments could have strategic implications on Israel's security," the official said, speaking on the condition of anonymity because the issues were still under discussion in diplomatic channels. "In the past Hamas was able to rearm when Egypt was making efforts to prevent that. How much more can they build their terrorist machine in Gaza if Egypt were to stop?"

I have an image of James Clapper testifying before a congressional committee, telling us with a straight face that the Muslim Brotherhood was a "secular" organization. The amateurs in the White House may have just helped lay the groundwork for another middle east war - and this one might go nuclear.



Exactly the opposite of what we have been hearing from the administration. Ain't democracy grand?

New York Times:


Egyptian officials, emboldened by the revolution and with an eye on coming elections, say that they are moving toward policies that more accurately reflect public opinion. In the process they are seeking to reclaim the influence over the region that waned as their country became a predictable ally of Washington and the Israelis in the years since the 1979 peace treaty with Israel.

The first major display of this new tack was the deal Egypt brokered Wednesday to reconcile the secular Palestinian party Fatah with its rival Hamas. "We are opening a new page," said Ambassador Menha Bakhoum, spokeswoman for the Foreign Ministry. "Egypt is resuming its role that was once abdicated."

Egypt's shifts are likely to alter the balance of power in the region, allowing Iran new access to a previously implacable foe and creating distance between itself and Israel, which has been watching the changes with some alarm. "We are troubled by some of the recent actions coming out of Egypt," said one senior Israeli official, citing a "rapprochement between Iran and Egypt" as well as "an upgrading of the relationship between Egypt and Hamas."

"These developments could have strategic implications on Israel's security," the official said, speaking on the condition of anonymity because the issues were still under discussion in diplomatic channels. "In the past Hamas was able to rearm when Egypt was making efforts to prevent that. How much more can they build their terrorist machine in Gaza if Egypt were to stop?"

I have an image of James Clapper testifying before a congressional committee, telling us with a straight face that the Muslim Brotherhood was a "secular" organization. The amateurs in the White House may have just helped lay the groundwork for another middle east war - and this one might go nuclear.