Brit Veteran Imprisoned for Koran Burning

Andrew G. Bostom
Remembrance Day is a memorial day observed in British  Commonwealth countries commemorating their armed forces who have died on duty since World War I.  In Flanders Fields was the inspiration for making the red remembrance poppy emblematic of the memorial celebrations on this solemn day. Red poppies bloomed across some of the bloodiest battlefields of Flanders during World War I, their brilliant red color an apposite symbol for the terrible bloodshed during the war.

Infuriated by Muslims burning poppies on Remembrance Day to insult British war veterans, former soldier Andrew Ryan admitted setting fire to a copy of the Koran in the centre of Carlisle. As reported by the BBC (with pathognomonic sneer quotes  around the word "objected") on March 24, 2011:

Appearing before city magistrates, 32-year-old Ryan, of Summerhill, admitted religiously aggravated harassment and theft of a Koran from a library...The hearing heard that the defendant set fire to the book near Carliol Cross monument at 1200 GMT on 19 January and the incident was witnessed by shoppers and schoolchildren. Lauren Heasley, for the defendant, said Ryan had not intended to stir up racial hatred but "objected" to Muslim extremists
The predictably sickening outcome in Dhimmi Britain, was reported yesterday (April 18, 2011) by the BBC -- a "news organization" which represents the fruition of nearly a century of deeply inculcated self-loathing: Ryan was sentenced to a 70-day prison term. Here are the courtroom lowlights, where the only patriotic, self-respecting, and sane parties in evidence are Ryan and his supporters:

Sitting at Carlisle Magistrates' Court, District Judge Gerald Chalk described it as a case of "theatrical bigotry." He said: "It was pre-planned by you as you stole the book deliberately. You went out to cause maximum publicity and to cause distress."

Ryan struggled with security guards in court after the sentence was passed. While being handcuffed he shouted: "What about my country? What about burning poppies?"

About 10 people were in court to support Ryan, and as they left the court they shouted "do you call this justice?"
Remembrance Day is a memorial day observed in British  Commonwealth countries commemorating their armed forces who have died on duty since World War I.  In Flanders Fields was the inspiration for making the red remembrance poppy emblematic of the memorial celebrations on this solemn day. Red poppies bloomed across some of the bloodiest battlefields of Flanders during World War I, their brilliant red color an apposite symbol for the terrible bloodshed during the war.

Infuriated by Muslims burning poppies on Remembrance Day to insult British war veterans, former soldier Andrew Ryan admitted setting fire to a copy of the Koran in the centre of Carlisle. As reported by the BBC (with pathognomonic sneer quotes  around the word "objected") on March 24, 2011:

Appearing before city magistrates, 32-year-old Ryan, of Summerhill, admitted religiously aggravated harassment and theft of a Koran from a library...The hearing heard that the defendant set fire to the book near Carliol Cross monument at 1200 GMT on 19 January and the incident was witnessed by shoppers and schoolchildren. Lauren Heasley, for the defendant, said Ryan had not intended to stir up racial hatred but "objected" to Muslim extremists
The predictably sickening outcome in Dhimmi Britain, was reported yesterday (April 18, 2011) by the BBC -- a "news organization" which represents the fruition of nearly a century of deeply inculcated self-loathing: Ryan was sentenced to a 70-day prison term. Here are the courtroom lowlights, where the only patriotic, self-respecting, and sane parties in evidence are Ryan and his supporters:

Sitting at Carlisle Magistrates' Court, District Judge Gerald Chalk described it as a case of "theatrical bigotry." He said: "It was pre-planned by you as you stole the book deliberately. You went out to cause maximum publicity and to cause distress."

Ryan struggled with security guards in court after the sentence was passed. While being handcuffed he shouted: "What about my country? What about burning poppies?"

About 10 people were in court to support Ryan, and as they left the court they shouted "do you call this justice?"