The case of the missing Iranian nuclear threat in new NIE

They are going to dub this National Intelligence Estimate on Iran, "The Ostrich." There really is no other way to describe the myopia of our intel people as they once again play politics with intelligence on Iran.

It appears the new NIE has dropped all references to Iran's nuclear bomb making program. The Washington Times:

An annual intelligence report to Congress has dropped language stating that Iran's nuclear weapons ambitions are a future option.

The revision comes as U.S. intelligence agencies recently altered a controversial 2007 intelligence assessment that said Iran halted work on nuclear arms in 2003 and was keeping open its options for building an atomic weapon.

The deleted language also had stated for two years that Iran was keeping open the option to build atomic weapons. However, the latest report to Congress, which was made public Feb. 23, no longer states that Iran's building a weapon is an option.

A U.S. official insisted there was no "sleight-of-hand" in the change but could not explain why the recent report was altered from two previous versions.

The omitted language is expected to be included in the prepared statement of Director of National IntelligenceJames Clapper when he appears before the Senate Armed Services Committee this week.

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper is to report on Iran's nuclear weapons ambitions at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing this week.

The question of "why" is an easy one; because if they include the language on Iran's bomb making program they will be expected to do something about it. Out of sight, out of mind is the Obama administration's motto when it comes to the Iranian nuke program that they have done precious little to stop since coming into office. Ineffective sanctions, weakness in the face of Iranian intransigence, humbled by Iranian arrogance - Obama and his crew appear to have resigned themselves to the reality of an Iranian bomb.

This is even more curious:

Also left out of the report is the statement that "Iran continues to develop a range of capabilities that could be applied to producing nuclear weapons if a decision is made to do so."

Mr. Clapper was asked during a Feb. 16 hearing about the language and said intelligence agencies were finishing a "memorandum for holders" of the NIE that he said was an update of the 2007 Iran assessment.

That NIE, which was partially released to the public, was widely criticized by current and former intelligence officials for stating that Iran halted work on its nuclear weapons program in 2003 but continued to develop uranium enrichment programs.

Disclosure of the change in the report's language comes as the director of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said in Vienna on Monday that he has new information on the military aspect of Iran's nuclear program.

This is, if anything, even more shocking. The head of the IAEA - the UN's meek and mild nuclear watchdog agency - sees a military component to the Iranian program while the administration ignores it?

When your response is weaker than the UN's, you know it's milquetoast.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky

They are going to dub this National Intelligence Estimate on Iran, "The Ostrich." There really is no other way to describe the myopia of our intel people as they once again play politics with intelligence on Iran.

It appears the new NIE has dropped all references to Iran's nuclear bomb making program. The Washington Times:

An annual intelligence report to Congress has dropped language stating that Iran's nuclear weapons ambitions are a future option.

The revision comes as U.S. intelligence agencies recently altered a controversial 2007 intelligence assessment that said Iran halted work on nuclear arms in 2003 and was keeping open its options for building an atomic weapon.

The deleted language also had stated for two years that Iran was keeping open the option to build atomic weapons. However, the latest report to Congress, which was made public Feb. 23, no longer states that Iran's building a weapon is an option.

A U.S. official insisted there was no "sleight-of-hand" in the change but could not explain why the recent report was altered from two previous versions.

The omitted language is expected to be included in the prepared statement of Director of National IntelligenceJames Clapper when he appears before the Senate Armed Services Committee this week.

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper is to report on Iran's nuclear weapons ambitions at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing this week.

The question of "why" is an easy one; because if they include the language on Iran's bomb making program they will be expected to do something about it. Out of sight, out of mind is the Obama administration's motto when it comes to the Iranian nuke program that they have done precious little to stop since coming into office. Ineffective sanctions, weakness in the face of Iranian intransigence, humbled by Iranian arrogance - Obama and his crew appear to have resigned themselves to the reality of an Iranian bomb.

This is even more curious:

Also left out of the report is the statement that "Iran continues to develop a range of capabilities that could be applied to producing nuclear weapons if a decision is made to do so."

Mr. Clapper was asked during a Feb. 16 hearing about the language and said intelligence agencies were finishing a "memorandum for holders" of the NIE that he said was an update of the 2007 Iran assessment.

That NIE, which was partially released to the public, was widely criticized by current and former intelligence officials for stating that Iran halted work on its nuclear weapons program in 2003 but continued to develop uranium enrichment programs.

Disclosure of the change in the report's language comes as the director of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said in Vienna on Monday that he has new information on the military aspect of Iran's nuclear program.

This is, if anything, even more shocking. The head of the IAEA - the UN's meek and mild nuclear watchdog agency - sees a military component to the Iranian program while the administration ignores it?

When your response is weaker than the UN's, you know it's milquetoast.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky

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