Mugabe to sell uranium to Iran

Rick Moran
Zimbabwe apparently doesn't feel that rules regarding supplying Iran with nuclear material applies to them. At least, that's the message from their foreign minister who made it plain that Robert Mugabe's rogue government will be glad to sell the Iranians the possible seeds of the world's destruction.

The Telegraph:


Simbarashe Mumbengegwi, Zimbabwe's foreign minister, said the sanctions - which prohibit member states from providing Iran with raw materials that it could use to make a nuclear weapon - were unfair and hypocritical.He said that Zimbabwe, which is also the subject of sanctions over human rights abuses perpetrated by President Robert Mugabe's supporters, would benefit economically from the agreement.

A leaked intelligence report suggests Iran will be awarded with exclusive access to Zimbabwe's uranium in return for providing the country with fuel.

The report - compiled by the United Nations' nuclear watchdog - said Iran's Foreign and Co-operative Ministers had visited Zimbabwe to strike a deal, and sent engineers to assess uranium deposits.

Experts say the move contradicts Iran's claim that it now has enough domestic uranium supplies to sustain its nuclear energy ambitions. They say Zimbabwe's defiance of sanctions and its support for the pariah state will scare those considering investing in its economy, which is only just starting to recover after years of hyperinflation.

Iran probably does have enough domestic uranium to supply its ever growing number of centrifuges that spin the refined ore into enriched uranium. However, the Iranian ore is of highly inferior quality with many impurities that have to be milled out of the ore before it can be enriched. In effect, Zimbabwe is going to make life easier for Iran's nuclear program by selling them a purer ore.

By eliminating several steps in the purification process, Zimbabwe has supercharged the Iranian bomb making program. What will the world do about it? No doubt, the Security Council will send a "strongly worded letter" to the Zimbabwean government taking them to task for violating the ban.

 

Zimbabwe apparently doesn't feel that rules regarding supplying Iran with nuclear material applies to them. At least, that's the message from their foreign minister who made it plain that Robert Mugabe's rogue government will be glad to sell the Iranians the possible seeds of the world's destruction.

The Telegraph:


Simbarashe Mumbengegwi, Zimbabwe's foreign minister, said the sanctions - which prohibit member states from providing Iran with raw materials that it could use to make a nuclear weapon - were unfair and hypocritical.

He said that Zimbabwe, which is also the subject of sanctions over human rights abuses perpetrated by President Robert Mugabe's supporters, would benefit economically from the agreement.

A leaked intelligence report suggests Iran will be awarded with exclusive access to Zimbabwe's uranium in return for providing the country with fuel.

The report - compiled by the United Nations' nuclear watchdog - said Iran's Foreign and Co-operative Ministers had visited Zimbabwe to strike a deal, and sent engineers to assess uranium deposits.

Experts say the move contradicts Iran's claim that it now has enough domestic uranium supplies to sustain its nuclear energy ambitions. They say Zimbabwe's defiance of sanctions and its support for the pariah state will scare those considering investing in its economy, which is only just starting to recover after years of hyperinflation.

Iran probably does have enough domestic uranium to supply its ever growing number of centrifuges that spin the refined ore into enriched uranium. However, the Iranian ore is of highly inferior quality with many impurities that have to be milled out of the ore before it can be enriched. In effect, Zimbabwe is going to make life easier for Iran's nuclear program by selling them a purer ore.

By eliminating several steps in the purification process, Zimbabwe has supercharged the Iranian bomb making program. What will the world do about it? No doubt, the Security Council will send a "strongly worded letter" to the Zimbabwean government taking them to task for violating the ban.