Marco Rubio - leader

Any leader can get out front of an issue when it is popular to do so.

But consequential leadership means taking a stand on unpopular issues and, through persuasion and example, bringing along your fellows to see it your way.

Barack Obama is the first kind of leader. Marco Rubio is the second.

A Wall Street Journal op-ed by the Florida senator:

Betting on America used to be a sure thing, but job creators see the warning signs that our leaders ignore. Even the world's largest bond fund, PIMCO, recently dumped its holdings of U.S. debt.We're therefore at a defining moment in American history. In a few weeks, we will once again reach our legal limit for borrowing, the so-called debt ceiling. The president and others want to raise this limit. They say it is the mature, responsible thing to do.

In fact, it's nothing more than putting off the tough decisions until after the next election. We cannot afford to continue waiting. This may be our last chance to force Washington to tackle the central economic issue of our time.

"Raising America's debt limit is a sign of leadership failure." So said then-Sen. Obama in 2006, when he voted against raising the debt ceiling by less than $800 billion to a new limit of $8.965 trillion. As America's debt now approaches its current $14.29 trillion limit, we are witnessing leadership failure of epic proportions.

I will vote to defeat an increase in the debt limit unless it is the last one we ever authorize and is accompanied by a plan for fundamental tax reform, an overhaul of our regulatory structure, a cut to discretionary spending, a balanced-budget amendment, and reforms to save Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid.

For someone so desirous of national office (someday - perhaps not 2012), Rubio has taken a brave stand. It would be easier to go along with establishment Republicans rather than risk the consequences that would accrue from taking a bold position on the debt. This is a very serious matter, as Rubio points out, and he has obviously given it a lot of thought - another sign of strong leadership.

There is a chance that he will not get any benefits at all from his position on the debt ceiling and may suffer some fallout for it. He will be accused of "pandering" to the tea party, but the follow up question to that is why should he? The Tea Party will not elect the next president and will not have a huge impact on the GOP race for the nomination. 

When suffering the downside of a position is outweighed by what a leader considers necessary and good, we used to call that "Profiles in Courage."

Marco Rubio has that quality in spades.




Any leader can get out front of an issue when it is popular to do so.

But consequential leadership means taking a stand on unpopular issues and, through persuasion and example, bringing along your fellows to see it your way.

Barack Obama is the first kind of leader. Marco Rubio is the second.

A Wall Street Journal op-ed by the Florida senator:

Betting on America used to be a sure thing, but job creators see the warning signs that our leaders ignore. Even the world's largest bond fund, PIMCO, recently dumped its holdings of U.S. debt.

We're therefore at a defining moment in American history. In a few weeks, we will once again reach our legal limit for borrowing, the so-called debt ceiling. The president and others want to raise this limit. They say it is the mature, responsible thing to do.

In fact, it's nothing more than putting off the tough decisions until after the next election. We cannot afford to continue waiting. This may be our last chance to force Washington to tackle the central economic issue of our time.

"Raising America's debt limit is a sign of leadership failure." So said then-Sen. Obama in 2006, when he voted against raising the debt ceiling by less than $800 billion to a new limit of $8.965 trillion. As America's debt now approaches its current $14.29 trillion limit, we are witnessing leadership failure of epic proportions.

I will vote to defeat an increase in the debt limit unless it is the last one we ever authorize and is accompanied by a plan for fundamental tax reform, an overhaul of our regulatory structure, a cut to discretionary spending, a balanced-budget amendment, and reforms to save Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid.

For someone so desirous of national office (someday - perhaps not 2012), Rubio has taken a brave stand. It would be easier to go along with establishment Republicans rather than risk the consequences that would accrue from taking a bold position on the debt. This is a very serious matter, as Rubio points out, and he has obviously given it a lot of thought - another sign of strong leadership.

There is a chance that he will not get any benefits at all from his position on the debt ceiling and may suffer some fallout for it. He will be accused of "pandering" to the tea party, but the follow up question to that is why should he? The Tea Party will not elect the next president and will not have a huge impact on the GOP race for the nomination. 

When suffering the downside of a position is outweighed by what a leader considers necessary and good, we used to call that "Profiles in Courage."

Marco Rubio has that quality in spades.




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