Barack Obama is Like the iPhone

William L. Gensert
The iPhone is a fantastic toy.  In fact, it may well be the finest toy of all times.  Just look at how it came from nowhere to take over the market in 2007.  We had to have it as our phone.  To recognize the brilliance of the iPhone made us feel superior, not just to others, but to our pre-iPhone selves.  It changed everything and we were proud to have one.  We felt better about ourselves with its purchase.  Its invention was a remarkable achievement.  It did so many things well; to not like the iPhone seemed like a character flaw.  Some had so much admiration, wonder and awe for the product that their already positive feelings intensified into outright, unashamed worship.

The iPhone is not great because of us; we are great because of the iPhone.  Yet, despite all its brilliance, it is really not much of a phone.  It was never meant to be just a phone; it was meant to be an extension of us.  In fact, the iPhone is all about us, it knows the apps we want, the music we need and the content we deserve.  It allows us to lose ourselves in our own "wonder of me" and be all we can be.

Barack Obama is a fantastic politician.  In fact, he may be the finest politician of all times.  Just look at how he came from nowhere and took over the political scene in 2008.  We had to have him as our president.  To recognize the brilliance of Barack Obama made us feel superior, not just to others, but to our pre-Barack Obama selves.  He changed everything and we were proud to have him.  We felt better about ourselves with his election.  His ascendency was a remarkable achievement.  He did so many things well; to not like Barack Obama seemed like a character flaw.  Some had so much admiration, wonder and awe for the man that their already positive feelings intensified into outright, unashamed worship.

Barack Obama is not great because of us; we are great because of Barack Obama.  Yet, despite all his brilliance, he is really not much of a president.  He was never meant to be just a president; he was meant to be an extension of us.  In fact, Barack Obama is all about us, he knows what we want, what we need and what we deserve.  He allows us to lose ourselves in our own "wonder of me" and be all we can be.

I love my iPhone and despite its shortcomings, when my contract is up in 2012, I will stick with it.  After all, it is brilliant and remarkable.

As far as Barack Obama is concerned, despite my love for the office of the presidency, I am overwhelmed by his shortcomings, and when his contract is up in 2012, I will gladly trade him in for someone, anyone not quite so brilliant and remarkable.

I guess in that respect, Barack Obama is not like an iPhone after all.
The iPhone is a fantastic toy.  In fact, it may well be the finest toy of all times.  Just look at how it came from nowhere to take over the market in 2007.  We had to have it as our phone.  To recognize the brilliance of the iPhone made us feel superior, not just to others, but to our pre-iPhone selves.  It changed everything and we were proud to have one.  We felt better about ourselves with its purchase.  Its invention was a remarkable achievement.  It did so many things well; to not like the iPhone seemed like a character flaw.  Some had so much admiration, wonder and awe for the product that their already positive feelings intensified into outright, unashamed worship.

The iPhone is not great because of us; we are great because of the iPhone.  Yet, despite all its brilliance, it is really not much of a phone.  It was never meant to be just a phone; it was meant to be an extension of us.  In fact, the iPhone is all about us, it knows the apps we want, the music we need and the content we deserve.  It allows us to lose ourselves in our own "wonder of me" and be all we can be.

Barack Obama is a fantastic politician.  In fact, he may be the finest politician of all times.  Just look at how he came from nowhere and took over the political scene in 2008.  We had to have him as our president.  To recognize the brilliance of Barack Obama made us feel superior, not just to others, but to our pre-Barack Obama selves.  He changed everything and we were proud to have him.  We felt better about ourselves with his election.  His ascendency was a remarkable achievement.  He did so many things well; to not like Barack Obama seemed like a character flaw.  Some had so much admiration, wonder and awe for the man that their already positive feelings intensified into outright, unashamed worship.

Barack Obama is not great because of us; we are great because of Barack Obama.  Yet, despite all his brilliance, he is really not much of a president.  He was never meant to be just a president; he was meant to be an extension of us.  In fact, Barack Obama is all about us, he knows what we want, what we need and what we deserve.  He allows us to lose ourselves in our own "wonder of me" and be all we can be.

I love my iPhone and despite its shortcomings, when my contract is up in 2012, I will stick with it.  After all, it is brilliant and remarkable.

As far as Barack Obama is concerned, despite my love for the office of the presidency, I am overwhelmed by his shortcomings, and when his contract is up in 2012, I will gladly trade him in for someone, anyone not quite so brilliant and remarkable.

I guess in that respect, Barack Obama is not like an iPhone after all.