Soviet Economist Agrees with Reagan, Labels USSR 'Evil Empire'

A famed and revered Soviet economist refers to the former USSR as an "evil empire," in an online article. I print this largely because I know that it will be a source of unending frustration for the liberals of our country. Reagan's labeling of the Soviet Union as an "evil empire" has drawn criticism from the left wing ever since Reagan spoke these iconic words in his famous speech, given March 8, 1983. It now it seems a Russian expert agrees with him.

The Russian in question is named Yuri Maltsev. Maltsev was an economist in the former USSR under Mikhail Gorbachev at the Russian Academy of Sciences. He is more than qualified to speak on the subject and has written at length about the millions of people killed by the communist regime of the former USSR. He served in the 1980s, during the perestroika unwinding of the Soviet Union. He witnessed the bodies piling up to the sky under the poisonous and brutal left-wing scheme of central planning. In an amazing and insightful article from mises.org, Maltsev offers his definitive, argument shattering analysis:

".....the primary problem in the Soviet Union was socialism, and it is still far from being dismantled in the nations that once made up that evil empire."

Maltsev's words appear to be a massive triumph for Ronald Reagan in the information war between communism and capitalism. They would appear to be a massive barb in the side of the liberals, who intentionally or unintentionally added to the Soviets' propaganda effort. Maltsev's article also serves as the introduction to the book "Requiem for Marx."

Reagan's words came at a time when faces were white with fear and paranoia over the spread of red communism across the globe. In the government buildings of Washington DC and Moscow, there were white knuckles and cigarette butts piled high in ashtrays over the idea that a tactical nuclear strike could turn a city into ash. At one point, the Soviet Union had gained the upper hand, with the advent of the menacing "Satan" missile. The appropriately titled "Satan R-36" ICBM missile had given the Soviets first strike capabilities against America. Russia could hit America before America could hit Russia. Period.

The criticism of Reagan's words has ranged far and wide, coming from sources including the liberal media and liberal academia. As a young man in the 1990s, one of the harshest rebukes of Reagan's phrase I heard came to me from the uber-cool band Rage Against the Machine. C'mon, I was a teenager. With a sarcastic twist, they named their second major label album "Evil Empire." The album was released in 1996. As a wiser adult, I recognized Rage Against the Machine's album title as the further indoctrination of the youth through cool social outlets such as music and TV. After all, Rage also endorsed mass murderer Che Guevara, a man who had many people executed, wanted to nuke America in 1962, and helped to drive Cuba into abject poverty, while America soared ever-higher into prosperity on the same time line.

I suppose what the left is getting at is the idea that Reagan's words were hypocritical, and that America was an "evil empire" itself, which is not true. I keep trying to conjure up examples of times in the Cold War when America was mismanaging its economy, both intentionally and unintentionally, and laying waste to tens of millions of people. Ideas of America's capitalist ideology piling bodies up to the sky and soldiering onwards just aren't coming to me. That image comes quickly to me when imagining Stalin, Krushchev, and even Gorbachev (as Maltsev points out), but not really America. In his article, Maltsev also states:

"In the name of Marxism, the death toll reached 100 million; the rivers of blood flowed from Russia to Kampuchea, from China to Czechoslovakia."

I suppose the left could argue that America's hegemony in Latin America drove the region into the depressed state that it is currently in. However, according to Maltsev, the communist/socialist system of central planning is the main driver behind the poverty of left wing countries -- not so much their relationship with foreign countries. Also, if Latin American countries would thrive if they could just divorce themselves from America, why isn't Cuba thriving right now? They have economic isolation and "freedom" from the "blood sucking capitalist regime" of America, yet they are neck deep in the muck of depressing poverty. I'd love to ask Cubans how that glorious freedom that Che and Castro granted them feels.

To recap, everyone who reads this needs to read Yuri Maltsev's article that is available through mises.org.  Maltsev was a witness, as the red machinery of communism ground up human bodies in the millions. He has an amazing, story to tell, backed up by numbers and figures, and his expert insight as an economist of the Soviet Union. He gives definitive proof that the USSR was indeed the "evil empire" that Ronald Reagan referred to, and the article serves as a strong rebuke to the liberals who contend that America was the true bad guy during the Cold War. When I think of the leftists taking ideological arms against Reagan's stance in the Cold War, the term "useful idiot" starts ringing in my mind.
A famed and revered Soviet economist refers to the former USSR as an "evil empire," in an online article. I print this largely because I know that it will be a source of unending frustration for the liberals of our country. Reagan's labeling of the Soviet Union as an "evil empire" has drawn criticism from the left wing ever since Reagan spoke these iconic words in his famous speech, given March 8, 1983. It now it seems a Russian expert agrees with him.

The Russian in question is named Yuri Maltsev. Maltsev was an economist in the former USSR under Mikhail Gorbachev at the Russian Academy of Sciences. He is more than qualified to speak on the subject and has written at length about the millions of people killed by the communist regime of the former USSR. He served in the 1980s, during the perestroika unwinding of the Soviet Union. He witnessed the bodies piling up to the sky under the poisonous and brutal left-wing scheme of central planning. In an amazing and insightful article from mises.org, Maltsev offers his definitive, argument shattering analysis:

".....the primary problem in the Soviet Union was socialism, and it is still far from being dismantled in the nations that once made up that evil empire."

Maltsev's words appear to be a massive triumph for Ronald Reagan in the information war between communism and capitalism. They would appear to be a massive barb in the side of the liberals, who intentionally or unintentionally added to the Soviets' propaganda effort. Maltsev's article also serves as the introduction to the book "Requiem for Marx."

Reagan's words came at a time when faces were white with fear and paranoia over the spread of red communism across the globe. In the government buildings of Washington DC and Moscow, there were white knuckles and cigarette butts piled high in ashtrays over the idea that a tactical nuclear strike could turn a city into ash. At one point, the Soviet Union had gained the upper hand, with the advent of the menacing "Satan" missile. The appropriately titled "Satan R-36" ICBM missile had given the Soviets first strike capabilities against America. Russia could hit America before America could hit Russia. Period.

The criticism of Reagan's words has ranged far and wide, coming from sources including the liberal media and liberal academia. As a young man in the 1990s, one of the harshest rebukes of Reagan's phrase I heard came to me from the uber-cool band Rage Against the Machine. C'mon, I was a teenager. With a sarcastic twist, they named their second major label album "Evil Empire." The album was released in 1996. As a wiser adult, I recognized Rage Against the Machine's album title as the further indoctrination of the youth through cool social outlets such as music and TV. After all, Rage also endorsed mass murderer Che Guevara, a man who had many people executed, wanted to nuke America in 1962, and helped to drive Cuba into abject poverty, while America soared ever-higher into prosperity on the same time line.

I suppose what the left is getting at is the idea that Reagan's words were hypocritical, and that America was an "evil empire" itself, which is not true. I keep trying to conjure up examples of times in the Cold War when America was mismanaging its economy, both intentionally and unintentionally, and laying waste to tens of millions of people. Ideas of America's capitalist ideology piling bodies up to the sky and soldiering onwards just aren't coming to me. That image comes quickly to me when imagining Stalin, Krushchev, and even Gorbachev (as Maltsev points out), but not really America. In his article, Maltsev also states:

"In the name of Marxism, the death toll reached 100 million; the rivers of blood flowed from Russia to Kampuchea, from China to Czechoslovakia."

I suppose the left could argue that America's hegemony in Latin America drove the region into the depressed state that it is currently in. However, according to Maltsev, the communist/socialist system of central planning is the main driver behind the poverty of left wing countries -- not so much their relationship with foreign countries. Also, if Latin American countries would thrive if they could just divorce themselves from America, why isn't Cuba thriving right now? They have economic isolation and "freedom" from the "blood sucking capitalist regime" of America, yet they are neck deep in the muck of depressing poverty. I'd love to ask Cubans how that glorious freedom that Che and Castro granted them feels.

To recap, everyone who reads this needs to read Yuri Maltsev's article that is available through mises.org.  Maltsev was a witness, as the red machinery of communism ground up human bodies in the millions. He has an amazing, story to tell, backed up by numbers and figures, and his expert insight as an economist of the Soviet Union. He gives definitive proof that the USSR was indeed the "evil empire" that Ronald Reagan referred to, and the article serves as a strong rebuke to the liberals who contend that America was the true bad guy during the Cold War. When I think of the leftists taking ideological arms against Reagan's stance in the Cold War, the term "useful idiot" starts ringing in my mind.

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