London court okays Assange extradition to Sweden

A British court has ruled against Wikileaks founder Julian Assange and ordered his return to Sweden in order to answer questions about two sexual assault charges filed against him.

The New York Times:

Mr. Assange, dressed in the blue suit he has worn to previous hearings, sat impassively as the decision was read. He is currently free on bail and the court continued that, subject to conditions which were being discussed.Judge Howard Riddle, in his ruling, said that allegations brought by two women qualified as extraditable offenses and that the warrant seeking Mr. Assange's return to Sweden for questioning was valid.

The verdict marks a turning point in the three-month battle in the British courts and the media against what Mr. Assange, his legal team and his celebrity supporters say is a conspiracy to stop WikiLeaks and its campaign to expose government and corporate secrets.

The case has been fought against the backdrop of the group's highest-profile operation yet - the release of a quarter of a million confidential American diplomatic cables that became the basis of articles by news organizations worldwide, including The New York Times.

The assault charges would seem convenient given the timing of them, but the two women making them are far left wing activists who went goo-goo eyed over being in the company of Mr. Assange. At the very least, we'll probably get a few answers to some nagging questions about why both women said "no" after first saying "yes."



A British court has ruled against Wikileaks founder Julian Assange and ordered his return to Sweden in order to answer questions about two sexual assault charges filed against him.

The New York Times:

Mr. Assange, dressed in the blue suit he has worn to previous hearings, sat impassively as the decision was read. He is currently free on bail and the court continued that, subject to conditions which were being discussed.

Judge Howard Riddle, in his ruling, said that allegations brought by two women qualified as extraditable offenses and that the warrant seeking Mr. Assange's return to Sweden for questioning was valid.

The verdict marks a turning point in the three-month battle in the British courts and the media against what Mr. Assange, his legal team and his celebrity supporters say is a conspiracy to stop WikiLeaks and its campaign to expose government and corporate secrets.

The case has been fought against the backdrop of the group's highest-profile operation yet - the release of a quarter of a million confidential American diplomatic cables that became the basis of articles by news organizations worldwide, including The New York Times.

The assault charges would seem convenient given the timing of them, but the two women making them are far left wing activists who went goo-goo eyed over being in the company of Mr. Assange. At the very least, we'll probably get a few answers to some nagging questions about why both women said "no" after first saying "yes."



RECENT VIDEOS