Libya explodes - 24 dead in anti-government rioting

The news comes from the US based Human Rights Watch but numerous sources are reporting thousands in the streets and a heavy military presence. The combination of those two realities does not bode well for the demonstrators.

BBC:

The BBC's Jon Leyne in Cairo says violent confrontations are reported to have spread to five Libyan cities in demonstrations so far, but not yet to Tripoli, the capital, in any large numbers.
Our correspondent says the reports reflect an extremely tough government response, including the use of gunfire and even denying supplies to hospitals.

Funerals of some of those killed are expected to be held on Friday in Benghazi and al-Bayda, which correspondents say could spur more protests.

Activists set up camps in al-Bayda after Thursday's "Day of Rage" protest against the government, witnesses said.

Eyewitnesses believe that the death toll could be even higher, our correspondent says.

Activists supporting Libya's leader, Muammar Gaddafi, have also been out on the streets in Tripoli, chanting pro-government slogans in Green Square.

Col Gaddafi briefly visited the square in the early hours of Friday, according to images aired by state TV, AFP news agency reports.

The usual social media efforts were used until Gaddafi shut the internet down yesterday.

This is a very tough response by the government. A doctor reported 15 dead - including a 13 year old boy - at a hospital in Benghazi, all from gunshot wounds. You know that Gaddafi thinks he's in trouble when he's shooting down unarmed protestors in the streets.

Another big day of demonstrations is expected today after Friday prayers.



The news comes from the US based Human Rights Watch but numerous sources are reporting thousands in the streets and a heavy military presence. The combination of those two realities does not bode well for the demonstrators.

BBC:

The BBC's Jon Leyne in Cairo says violent confrontations are reported to have spread to five Libyan cities in demonstrations so far, but not yet to Tripoli, the capital, in any large numbers.

Our correspondent says the reports reflect an extremely tough government response, including the use of gunfire and even denying supplies to hospitals.

Funerals of some of those killed are expected to be held on Friday in Benghazi and al-Bayda, which correspondents say could spur more protests.

Activists set up camps in al-Bayda after Thursday's "Day of Rage" protest against the government, witnesses said.

Eyewitnesses believe that the death toll could be even higher, our correspondent says.

Activists supporting Libya's leader, Muammar Gaddafi, have also been out on the streets in Tripoli, chanting pro-government slogans in Green Square.

Col Gaddafi briefly visited the square in the early hours of Friday, according to images aired by state TV, AFP news agency reports.

The usual social media efforts were used until Gaddafi shut the internet down yesterday.

This is a very tough response by the government. A doctor reported 15 dead - including a 13 year old boy - at a hospital in Benghazi, all from gunshot wounds. You know that Gaddafi thinks he's in trouble when he's shooting down unarmed protestors in the streets.

Another big day of demonstrations is expected today after Friday prayers.



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