Charges near in Edwards case?

Experienced court watchers believe that John Edwards is going to be tried for possible violation of election laws in trying to cover up his extramarital affair.

MSNBC:

A two-year grand jury investigation of John Edwards has reached a decisive point. Prosecutors believe they have a strong case, but have not yet gotten a green light from the Justice Department to charge the former presidential candidate, NBC News has learned. The issue: did Edwards violate election laws by trying to cover up his affair with a campaign videographer, Rielle Hunter. Sources close to the investigation say Justice Department attorneys are now conducting a final review of evidence, and an indictment could come within days or weeks. In what could be an ominous development for Edwards, prosecutors already are making arrangements to record the sworn testimony of a key witness for possible use in a future trial, said the sources, speaking on condition of anonymity.

"It would be surprising now if he wasn't indicted," said Stephen Saltzburg, a former federal prosecutor and George Washington University law professor. "If John Edwards was aware that money was being paid to hide his mistress... and it was done to help his campaign, then he's in trouble."

Edwards' attorney, Wade Smith, recently said, "We do not believe there is evidence that John has violated any election laws." John Edwards, 57, has repeatedly said that he did nothing wrong, and a spokesperson said he remains optimistic that the investigation will confirm that.

The witnesses and evidence seem pretty solid:

Federal prosecutors are trying to prove Edwards had a hand in the payment of more than $1 million provided by two key supporters...money used, according to numerous sources, to keep Hunter quiet and out of sight. Prosecutors are examining whether the money spent on Hunter should have been treated and reported as campaign contributions, since keeping her way from the press was crucial to Edwards remaining a viable candidate. One year ago, Edwards admitted he fathered a little girl with Hunter. Frances Quinn Hunter turns 3 on Feb. 27.

Key testimony will come from a former aide who acted as middleman for the transactions.

Edwards was one of the most unattractive modern American politicians. His angry populist personae played well with people who felt resentment against the rich, and he was a fair to middling speaker. But he was a shameless opportunist, a hustler, and in the end, proved to be a morally bankrupt man.




Experienced court watchers believe that John Edwards is going to be tried for possible violation of election laws in trying to cover up his extramarital affair.

MSNBC:

A two-year grand jury investigation of John Edwards has reached a decisive point. Prosecutors believe they have a strong case, but have not yet gotten a green light from the Justice Department to charge the former presidential candidate, NBC News has learned. The issue: did Edwards violate election laws by trying to cover up his affair with a campaign videographer, Rielle Hunter.

Sources close to the investigation say Justice Department attorneys are now conducting a final review of evidence, and an indictment could come within days or weeks. In what could be an ominous development for Edwards, prosecutors already are making arrangements to record the sworn testimony of a key witness for possible use in a future trial, said the sources, speaking on condition of anonymity.

"It would be surprising now if he wasn't indicted," said Stephen Saltzburg, a former federal prosecutor and George Washington University law professor. "If John Edwards was aware that money was being paid to hide his mistress... and it was done to help his campaign, then he's in trouble."

Edwards' attorney, Wade Smith, recently said, "We do not believe there is evidence that John has violated any election laws." John Edwards, 57, has repeatedly said that he did nothing wrong, and a spokesperson said he remains optimistic that the investigation will confirm that.

The witnesses and evidence seem pretty solid:

Federal prosecutors are trying to prove Edwards had a hand in the payment of more than $1 million provided by two key supporters...money used, according to numerous sources, to keep Hunter quiet and out of sight. Prosecutors are examining whether the money spent on Hunter should have been treated and reported as campaign contributions, since keeping her way from the press was crucial to Edwards remaining a viable candidate. One year ago, Edwards admitted he fathered a little girl with Hunter. Frances Quinn Hunter turns 3 on Feb. 27.

Key testimony will come from a former aide who acted as middleman for the transactions.

Edwards was one of the most unattractive modern American politicians. His angry populist personae played well with people who felt resentment against the rich, and he was a fair to middling speaker. But he was a shameless opportunist, a hustler, and in the end, proved to be a morally bankrupt man.




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