Bolton: Obama 'plain wrong' on Egypt

Rick Moran
John Bolton is a man who speaks in clear, concise sentences with no ambiguity about what he intends to say. It is perhaps this quality that endears him to conservatives who respect the fact that he pulls no punches, spares no sacred cows, and generally cuts through the BS to the heart of any problem or issue.

Bolton at CPAC via CNN:

Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton condemned President Obama as "weak" and "indecisive" on foreign affairs while speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference Saturday.And specifically on the topic of the revolution in Egypt, Bolton stated "We don't have the leadership in the White House that can deal with it."

[...]

Bolton described the Obama administration's approach to Egypt as "hesitant, inconsistent, confused, and just plain wrong."

Bolton recognized the Egyptian call for democracy, but questioned the administration's answer. "We have some degree of optimism, we can recognize that many of the people are legitimately calling for liberty and democracy as we see it," he said.

"But we know it is a responsibility of our government to protect our government and our friends and our allies," he continued, "Never forget Theodore Roosevelt's response: first and foremost we must make the world safe for ourselves."

Recommending a "careful and prudent approach," Bolton cautioned that "A democratic election can produce illiberal results. If you want to see what a Muslim Brotherhood looks like when it takes control, look at Hamas in the Gaza strip, it's not pretty."

There has been a lot of comparisons the past 48 hours to Gaza and the Hamas "victory" at the polls in 2006. This is in contrast to the drumbeat of optimistic, rhetorically ridiculous assertions that what happened on Friday in Egypt was a "democratic" revolution. The theme being presented by the press is that not only was the Egyptian uprising benign, but that it will actually work in favor of US interests.

That, of course, is to be hoped. But history and practical reality suggests otherwise. We should hope that Bolton keeps speaking out about events in Egypt as they unfold over the next few months. His words are a necessary balm to the claptrap being put out by the media.



John Bolton is a man who speaks in clear, concise sentences with no ambiguity about what he intends to say. It is perhaps this quality that endears him to conservatives who respect the fact that he pulls no punches, spares no sacred cows, and generally cuts through the BS to the heart of any problem or issue.

Bolton at CPAC via CNN:

Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton condemned President Obama as "weak" and "indecisive" on foreign affairs while speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference Saturday.

And specifically on the topic of the revolution in Egypt, Bolton stated "We don't have the leadership in the White House that can deal with it."

[...]

Bolton described the Obama administration's approach to Egypt as "hesitant, inconsistent, confused, and just plain wrong."

Bolton recognized the Egyptian call for democracy, but questioned the administration's answer. "We have some degree of optimism, we can recognize that many of the people are legitimately calling for liberty and democracy as we see it," he said.

"But we know it is a responsibility of our government to protect our government and our friends and our allies," he continued, "Never forget Theodore Roosevelt's response: first and foremost we must make the world safe for ourselves."

Recommending a "careful and prudent approach," Bolton cautioned that "A democratic election can produce illiberal results. If you want to see what a Muslim Brotherhood looks like when it takes control, look at Hamas in the Gaza strip, it's not pretty."

There has been a lot of comparisons the past 48 hours to Gaza and the Hamas "victory" at the polls in 2006. This is in contrast to the drumbeat of optimistic, rhetorically ridiculous assertions that what happened on Friday in Egypt was a "democratic" revolution. The theme being presented by the press is that not only was the Egyptian uprising benign, but that it will actually work in favor of US interests.

That, of course, is to be hoped. But history and practical reality suggests otherwise. We should hope that Bolton keeps speaking out about events in Egypt as they unfold over the next few months. His words are a necessary balm to the claptrap being put out by the media.