Amanpour reaps what she's sown

Jeannie DeAngelis
Christiane Amanpour has spent her entire career pretending to be an impartial journalist.  Yet, the dark-haired Iranian with the British accent has taken every opportunity to use journalism as a tool to undermine America and her ally Israel's reputation on the world stage.

Ms. Amanpour has had many low points in her quest to portray the United States in a less than favorable light. In the Muslim world, America's standing was severely damaged when, in an unbiased way, the London-raised journalist commiserated with radical terrorists by suggesting that the Bush administration's use of enhanced interrogation mirrored Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge.

In Dharamsala, India, while Christiane interviewed the Dalai Lama, she peppered her commentary with innuendo. Amanpour suggested that the Dalai Lama successfully evading Chinese Communist forces on horseback in 1959 was a "somber remembrance that is a little like what the Palestinians do every year." Christiane said: "They call it al-Nakba, or ‘catastrophe,' which marks 1948 when they lost much of their land as the state of Israel was founded."

Amanpour's pathetic attempt to demean the nation of Israel is rivaled only by her describing American Christianity in the same breath as radical Islam.  Referring to the CNN special God's Warriors, the neither fair, nor impartial host shared: "Wherever I go, what the believers do all have in common is that they want to bring the politics of faith into the very center of public life - we are seeing this now on almost every continent."

Amanpour's comments implied little difference between theocratic Islamists imposing Sharia law on whole nations and evangelical Christians in the United States choosing to participate in government and politics.

On a personal note, Christiane is married to James Rubin, former State Department spokesman in the Clinton administration. Rubin "worked as a foreign policy adviser on Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign...[and] would like to work in the Obama administration."

Even after Christiane expressed the partisan opinion that merely having Barack Obama as President abated global disdain for America, Mrs. Rubin remains convinced, "Nobody knows [her] biases."

Defending Obama's Nobel Peace Prize Amanpour said, in just six months, the President had "Obviously done something very significant, and that is, after eight years in which the United States was really held in contempt," thanks to Barack, the United States has "a new relationship with the rest of the world."

Two years later, while embedded as a reporter in Cairo, Amanpour personally experienced the result of Obama's Middle East peace effort. After spending decades promoting anti-American sentiment, Christiane ironically became a victim of the type of hostility her journalistic bias has helped foster around the world.

Reporting from Tahir Square, the ABC News reporter was attacked by an "angry mob of pro-Mubarak protesters" that surrounded Ms. Amanpour and chased her car, shouting hate for America as well as hate for the American media.

Stranded in Cairo, being pursued by a furious anti-American mob, Amanpour must have secretly been wishing she were home in the mean old US of A, especially when protesters "kicked in the doors" and "broke [the] windshield" as she and her cameramen drove away.

Imagine the twist of fate! After years of portraying the United States in a negative light, to find yourself defenseless against the very people you've strived to ingratiate. Far from the safety of America's shores, struggling with an "overwhelming sense of fear," would a person like Christiane Amanpour even stop to consider that maybe the words she's built her America/Israel-hating career upon could be what helped fuel an atmosphere that endangered her life and threatens world?


Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com


 

Christiane Amanpour has spent her entire career pretending to be an impartial journalist.  Yet, the dark-haired Iranian with the British accent has taken every opportunity to use journalism as a tool to undermine America and her ally Israel's reputation on the world stage.

Ms. Amanpour has had many low points in her quest to portray the United States in a less than favorable light. In the Muslim world, America's standing was severely damaged when, in an unbiased way, the London-raised journalist commiserated with radical terrorists by suggesting that the Bush administration's use of enhanced interrogation mirrored Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge.

In Dharamsala, India, while Christiane interviewed the Dalai Lama, she peppered her commentary with innuendo. Amanpour suggested that the Dalai Lama successfully evading Chinese Communist forces on horseback in 1959 was a "somber remembrance that is a little like what the Palestinians do every year." Christiane said: "They call it al-Nakba, or ‘catastrophe,' which marks 1948 when they lost much of their land as the state of Israel was founded."

Amanpour's pathetic attempt to demean the nation of Israel is rivaled only by her describing American Christianity in the same breath as radical Islam.  Referring to the CNN special God's Warriors, the neither fair, nor impartial host shared: "Wherever I go, what the believers do all have in common is that they want to bring the politics of faith into the very center of public life - we are seeing this now on almost every continent."

Amanpour's comments implied little difference between theocratic Islamists imposing Sharia law on whole nations and evangelical Christians in the United States choosing to participate in government and politics.

On a personal note, Christiane is married to James Rubin, former State Department spokesman in the Clinton administration. Rubin "worked as a foreign policy adviser on Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign...[and] would like to work in the Obama administration."

Even after Christiane expressed the partisan opinion that merely having Barack Obama as President abated global disdain for America, Mrs. Rubin remains convinced, "Nobody knows [her] biases."

Defending Obama's Nobel Peace Prize Amanpour said, in just six months, the President had "Obviously done something very significant, and that is, after eight years in which the United States was really held in contempt," thanks to Barack, the United States has "a new relationship with the rest of the world."

Two years later, while embedded as a reporter in Cairo, Amanpour personally experienced the result of Obama's Middle East peace effort. After spending decades promoting anti-American sentiment, Christiane ironically became a victim of the type of hostility her journalistic bias has helped foster around the world.

Reporting from Tahir Square, the ABC News reporter was attacked by an "angry mob of pro-Mubarak protesters" that surrounded Ms. Amanpour and chased her car, shouting hate for America as well as hate for the American media.

Stranded in Cairo, being pursued by a furious anti-American mob, Amanpour must have secretly been wishing she were home in the mean old US of A, especially when protesters "kicked in the doors" and "broke [the] windshield" as she and her cameramen drove away.

Imagine the twist of fate! After years of portraying the United States in a negative light, to find yourself defenseless against the very people you've strived to ingratiate. Far from the safety of America's shores, struggling with an "overwhelming sense of fear," would a person like Christiane Amanpour even stop to consider that maybe the words she's built her America/Israel-hating career upon could be what helped fuel an atmosphere that endangered her life and threatens world?


Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com