We Need A Real Halt To The Regulatory Assault

In an opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal on Tuesday, President Obama signaled an effort to end the strangulation of job growth by the federal government.  His argument is that the ever growing mountains of red tape and regulations hamper job growth, resulting in impeding any real economic recovery.

First off, he happens to be correct in analyzing the problem.  But most importantly, is this a real attempt at crucial reform or is it merely a nod to what people want while his administration continues its assault on business?


Earlier this month, the Associated Builders and Contractors sent a letter to Rep. Darrell Issa which addressed what real reform would look like.  The
letter states:

Unfortunately, some of the regulations for our industry impose heavy costs with no clear, or very limited benefit.  In many cases, these regulations are based on conjecture and speculation, lacking a foundation in sound scientific analysis.  In a few egregious cases, these regulations even circumvent will of Congress and conflict with underlying statutory requirements.  Regulations of this kind impose unnecessary and unjustified costs, which, in turn, hinder economic recovery and job growth.

As a businessman, I can tell you that's putting it politely ... and mildly. The letter goes on to state a sizable list of very pressing issues that are stifling the industry, but the kicker is that most all of them are creations or priorities of Obama's own administration.  Is he now signalling a retreat on his own agenda for shaping government?  

Echoing this skepticism is a column in the Washington Examiner.  After listing a similar wish list of vital reforms,
it concludes:

But it's a beginning that begs a bigger question: Would undoing all these regulations leave Obama with much of a presidency? After all, these governmental forays into all corners of our lives appear to be the purpose of, rather than unintended consequence to, his occupancy at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Whether this newfound religion on reducing government regulations is real or not, one can only keep a watchful eye and remember what happens come November 2012.


Brett McMahon is a spokesman for the Free Enterprise Alliance's Halt The Assault campaign


In an opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal on Tuesday, President Obama signaled an effort to end the strangulation of job growth by the federal government.  His argument is that the ever growing mountains of red tape and regulations hamper job growth, resulting in impeding any real economic recovery.

First off, he happens to be correct in analyzing the problem.  But most importantly, is this a real attempt at crucial reform or is it merely a nod to what people want while his administration continues its assault on business?


Earlier this month, the Associated Builders and Contractors sent a letter to Rep. Darrell Issa which addressed what real reform would look like.  The
letter states:

Unfortunately, some of the regulations for our industry impose heavy costs with no clear, or very limited benefit.  In many cases, these regulations are based on conjecture and speculation, lacking a foundation in sound scientific analysis.  In a few egregious cases, these regulations even circumvent will of Congress and conflict with underlying statutory requirements.  Regulations of this kind impose unnecessary and unjustified costs, which, in turn, hinder economic recovery and job growth.

As a businessman, I can tell you that's putting it politely ... and mildly. The letter goes on to state a sizable list of very pressing issues that are stifling the industry, but the kicker is that most all of them are creations or priorities of Obama's own administration.  Is he now signalling a retreat on his own agenda for shaping government?  

Echoing this skepticism is a column in the Washington Examiner.  After listing a similar wish list of vital reforms,
it concludes:

But it's a beginning that begs a bigger question: Would undoing all these regulations leave Obama with much of a presidency? After all, these governmental forays into all corners of our lives appear to be the purpose of, rather than unintended consequence to, his occupancy at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Whether this newfound religion on reducing government regulations is real or not, one can only keep a watchful eye and remember what happens come November 2012.


Brett McMahon is a spokesman for the Free Enterprise Alliance's Halt The Assault campaign


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