There are times when civility is not the answer

Bill Weckesser
There can certainly be too much civility.  This is especially true where civility morphs into a hyper politeness that politicians can cower behind as political subterfuge.  There's hardly a more graphic example than the black genocide going on in....America

Chuck Colson, on his Breakpoint Commentary, relates the story of Walter Hoy, a modern day Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  Like Dr. King, Hoy uses non-violence to focus his ministry on the plight of African Americans.  Additionally, like his predecessor, he's spent time behind bars for his convictions.  Mr. Hoy has been jailed in the U.S. for violating a "bubble zone" ordinance in an abortion facility where he'd been counseling for life. 

When Dr. King wrote his letter, From a Birmingham Jail, he addressed those who thought his civil rights activities unwise and untimely. In his speeches, Hoy also addresses those who say that his cause is worthy and just but that he should just wait. "I can't wait." Hoy says. "You see, my people are dying."

Since 1973, he notes, over 14.5 million black babies have been killed by abortion. Every, single day, 1,200 black babies are put to death in abortion facilities, making abortion the leading cause of death among African Americans! Nearly half of all black babies conceived die in abortion chambers today. Hoy says this means that a black child is safer on the streets of the worst neighborhoods in American than in his mother's womb.

Hoy notes that between 1882 and 1968, 3,446 blacks were lynched by the Ku Klux Klan. Today, abortion kills more black Americans in less than three days than the Klan killed in 86 years! Think of it.

American blacks make up twelve percent of the U.S. population, yet thirty-seven percent of all abortions are performed on black women. This is because eugenic-minded pro-abortion forces target American blacks by putting abortion clinics in black neighborhoods, according to Hoy. 

He's also turned his rhetorical guns on America's first black president. Quoting Elvita King, niece of Dr. King, he says that "those of us who care about the civil rights of all Americans-born and unborn--oppose Obamacare because we oppose the expansion of the most racist industry in America--the abortion industry."

The high black abortion rate has ominous implications down the road. According to the 2006 U.S. Census, the black fertility rate is 1.9--well below the replacement rate of 2.1. "Within a few decades," Hoy warns, "African Americans may well be an endangered species." This is why he calls abortion the "Darfur of the black community."

Mr. Obama's silence on this African American genocide is deafening.  Of course, he's quite civil on the matter.  He's civilly and politely quiet.  And, sadly, so too are all those tea-party conservatives who admonish us to disregard the moral issues.  Perhaps we do so at our own peril.

Scripture relates the story of Jesus over-turning the tables of the merchants who'd turned the ancient temple into a bazaar.  The Apostle Paul counsels that one can, "be angry and sin not."  (Eph 4:26).  Certainly there are moral matters worth fighting for, even if doing so ruffles feathers and appears to be uncivil.

Bill Weckesser
E. Lansing, MI
There can certainly be too much civility.  This is especially true where civility morphs into a hyper politeness that politicians can cower behind as political subterfuge.  There's hardly a more graphic example than the black genocide going on in....America

Chuck Colson, on his Breakpoint Commentary, relates the story of Walter Hoy, a modern day Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  Like Dr. King, Hoy uses non-violence to focus his ministry on the plight of African Americans.  Additionally, like his predecessor, he's spent time behind bars for his convictions.  Mr. Hoy has been jailed in the U.S. for violating a "bubble zone" ordinance in an abortion facility where he'd been counseling for life. 

When Dr. King wrote his letter, From a Birmingham Jail, he addressed those who thought his civil rights activities unwise and untimely. In his speeches, Hoy also addresses those who say that his cause is worthy and just but that he should just wait. "I can't wait." Hoy says. "You see, my people are dying."

Since 1973, he notes, over 14.5 million black babies have been killed by abortion. Every, single day, 1,200 black babies are put to death in abortion facilities, making abortion the leading cause of death among African Americans! Nearly half of all black babies conceived die in abortion chambers today. Hoy says this means that a black child is safer on the streets of the worst neighborhoods in American than in his mother's womb.

Hoy notes that between 1882 and 1968, 3,446 blacks were lynched by the Ku Klux Klan. Today, abortion kills more black Americans in less than three days than the Klan killed in 86 years! Think of it.

American blacks make up twelve percent of the U.S. population, yet thirty-seven percent of all abortions are performed on black women. This is because eugenic-minded pro-abortion forces target American blacks by putting abortion clinics in black neighborhoods, according to Hoy. 

He's also turned his rhetorical guns on America's first black president. Quoting Elvita King, niece of Dr. King, he says that "those of us who care about the civil rights of all Americans-born and unborn--oppose Obamacare because we oppose the expansion of the most racist industry in America--the abortion industry."

The high black abortion rate has ominous implications down the road. According to the 2006 U.S. Census, the black fertility rate is 1.9--well below the replacement rate of 2.1. "Within a few decades," Hoy warns, "African Americans may well be an endangered species." This is why he calls abortion the "Darfur of the black community."

Mr. Obama's silence on this African American genocide is deafening.  Of course, he's quite civil on the matter.  He's civilly and politely quiet.  And, sadly, so too are all those tea-party conservatives who admonish us to disregard the moral issues.  Perhaps we do so at our own peril.

Scripture relates the story of Jesus over-turning the tables of the merchants who'd turned the ancient temple into a bazaar.  The Apostle Paul counsels that one can, "be angry and sin not."  (Eph 4:26).  Certainly there are moral matters worth fighting for, even if doing so ruffles feathers and appears to be uncivil.

Bill Weckesser
E. Lansing, MI