The six dead innocents of the AZ shooting

Rick Moran
Michelle Malkin has the grim list of innocent victims who have died as a result of wounds received during the AZ shootings yesterday.

Not receiving half the attention accorded to Rep. Giffords, is the tragic death of federal judge John Roll who, unrelated to the shooting by the madman Loughner, received numerous death threats for some of his immigration rulings:

John. M. Roll, the federal judge killed Saturday in the Tucson shooting that critically wounded Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.), has been at the center of the state's complicated political battle over immigration.

In February 2009, Roll received hundreds of threats after he allowed a lawsuit filed by illegal immigrants against a rancher to go forward. "They cursed him out, threatened to kill his family, said they'd come and take care of him. They really wanted him dead," a law enforcement official told The Washington Post in May 2009.

Threats against federal judges and prosecutors nationwide have been soaring in recent years. There is no indication he was the gunman's target, and witness accounts describe the shooter as firing at Giffords first.

U.S. marshals put Roll, who was appointed to the federal bench by President George H.W. Bush in 1991, under 24-hour protection for about a month. They guarded his home in a secluded area just outside Tucson, screening his mail and escorting him to court, to the gym and even to Mass.

Roll told the Post in May 2009 that "any judge who goes through this knows it's a stressful situation" and that he and his family were grateful for the protection.

Also killed was a 9 year old girl, Christina Greene. Christina was born on September 11, 2001:

Greene's family says she was vibrant, excited about life, and she was the "best daughter in the world."

Born September 11, 2001, Greene was excited about the political process, was on the student government, and went to the Giffords event Saturday to learn more about the political process, family members say.

Greene attended Mesa Verde Elementary School. She was the only girl on the Canyon Del Oro baseball team. She loved the sport, as well as horseback riding and swimming. She wanted to be a veterinarian.

As aide to the congresswoman, Gabe Zimmerman, died in the attack as well:

Zimmerman was remembered by friends and colleagues on Saturday night as friendly, dedicated and good humored.

He was engaged to be married, according to media reports, and had served as a major point of contact for the congresswoman since 2007.

Zimmerman, who worked out of the congresswoman's Tucson office, was known by local interest groups for going above and beyond the call of duty.

Several photographs on the Internet show Zimmerman, who was a former social worker, smiling with his arms around local community leaders.

Among them was Pat Gould, a support group leader in the local chapter of the Scleroderma Foundation. With Zimmerman's help, the group was able to garner Giffords' support for legislation recognizing the disease.

Also killed in the attack: Dorthy Murray, 76; Dorwin Stoddard, 76; and Phyllis Scheck, 79. According to a tweet from ABC's Jake Tapper who is at the hospital, there are still 4 victims in critical condition and 5 in serious condition. Earlier reports that Giffords woke up and recognized her husband before falling back into unconciousness were false .


Michelle Malkin has the grim list of innocent victims who have died as a result of wounds received during the AZ shootings yesterday.

Not receiving half the attention accorded to Rep. Giffords, is the tragic death of federal judge John Roll who, unrelated to the shooting by the madman Loughner, received numerous death threats for some of his immigration rulings:

John. M. Roll, the federal judge killed Saturday in the Tucson shooting that critically wounded Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.), has been at the center of the state's complicated political battle over immigration.

In February 2009, Roll received hundreds of threats after he allowed a lawsuit filed by illegal immigrants against a rancher to go forward. "They cursed him out, threatened to kill his family, said they'd come and take care of him. They really wanted him dead," a law enforcement official told The Washington Post in May 2009.

Threats against federal judges and prosecutors nationwide have been soaring in recent years. There is no indication he was the gunman's target, and witness accounts describe the shooter as firing at Giffords first.

U.S. marshals put Roll, who was appointed to the federal bench by President George H.W. Bush in 1991, under 24-hour protection for about a month. They guarded his home in a secluded area just outside Tucson, screening his mail and escorting him to court, to the gym and even to Mass.

Roll told the Post in May 2009 that "any judge who goes through this knows it's a stressful situation" and that he and his family were grateful for the protection.

Also killed was a 9 year old girl, Christina Greene. Christina was born on September 11, 2001:

Greene's family says she was vibrant, excited about life, and she was the "best daughter in the world."

Born September 11, 2001, Greene was excited about the political process, was on the student government, and went to the Giffords event Saturday to learn more about the political process, family members say.

Greene attended Mesa Verde Elementary School. She was the only girl on the Canyon Del Oro baseball team. She loved the sport, as well as horseback riding and swimming. She wanted to be a veterinarian.

As aide to the congresswoman, Gabe Zimmerman, died in the attack as well:

Zimmerman was remembered by friends and colleagues on Saturday night as friendly, dedicated and good humored.

He was engaged to be married, according to media reports, and had served as a major point of contact for the congresswoman since 2007.

Zimmerman, who worked out of the congresswoman's Tucson office, was known by local interest groups for going above and beyond the call of duty.

Several photographs on the Internet show Zimmerman, who was a former social worker, smiling with his arms around local community leaders.

Among them was Pat Gould, a support group leader in the local chapter of the Scleroderma Foundation. With Zimmerman's help, the group was able to garner Giffords' support for legislation recognizing the disease.

Also killed in the attack: Dorthy Murray, 76; Dorwin Stoddard, 76; and Phyllis Scheck, 79. According to a tweet from ABC's Jake Tapper who is at the hospital, there are still 4 victims in critical condition and 5 in serious condition. Earlier reports that Giffords woke up and recognized her husband before falling back into unconciousness were false .