Olbermann's exit in the works for weeks

TMZ is reporting that Keith Olbermann's departure from MSNBC was hardly "abrupt," and had been under discussion for weeks:

Sources familiar with the situation tell us that Olbermann's agent recently went to NBC complaining that Keith -- who has the most popular show on MSNBC -- was underpaid at $7 million per year. NBC execs told Olbermann's agent they would not cough up anymore money.Network execs were well aware that Comcast wanted Keith gone because he was "a loose cannon that could not be controlled." It became clear to both sides that Olbermann's days were numbered and they began negotiating an exit.

We're told the exit deal wasn't completed until just before airtime Friday night.

Under the deal, sources say Olbermann will get money but cannot appear on television for a certain period time -- we don't know how long.

Our sources say Olbermann will, however, reappear soon with a presence on the Internet.

Meanwhile, the idea that Comcast exerted any influence whatsoever in Olbermann's decision to leave has largely been debunked. The coincidence of the timing of the announcement with the FCC's approval of the merger between Comcast and NBCU is just that; a coincidence. The negotiations had been going on long before the FCC's final decision.

Did Olbermann have just cause to think Comcast, once they took over, would can him? Methinks Keith suffers from a bit of paranoia as this Media Decoder post suggests:


Months before Comcast was expected to gain control of NBC Universal, Comcast officials were worried about the perception that they might interfere with MSNBC for political reasons.

One executive, who asked not to be identified because Comcast had instructed employees not to speak about the situation, said the company dreaded the prospect of being blamed if Mr. Olbermann were to quit soon after the takeover.

Does that sound like a company eager to muzzle liberals, especially Olbermann?

I think Olbermann will spend a few months writing for various far left sites while he launches a radio show. The idea that another cable net would hire him is puzzling. CNN wouldn't touch him and Fox hopes he goes away and never comes back. Is there another alternative?

Stay tuned.


TMZ is reporting that Keith Olbermann's departure from MSNBC was hardly "abrupt," and had been under discussion for weeks:

Sources familiar with the situation tell us that Olbermann's agent recently went to NBC complaining that Keith -- who has the most popular show on MSNBC -- was underpaid at $7 million per year. NBC execs told Olbermann's agent they would not cough up anymore money.

Network execs were well aware that Comcast wanted Keith gone because he was "a loose cannon that could not be controlled." It became clear to both sides that Olbermann's days were numbered and they began negotiating an exit.

We're told the exit deal wasn't completed until just before airtime Friday night.

Under the deal, sources say Olbermann will get money but cannot appear on television for a certain period time -- we don't know how long.

Our sources say Olbermann will, however, reappear soon with a presence on the Internet.

Meanwhile, the idea that Comcast exerted any influence whatsoever in Olbermann's decision to leave has largely been debunked. The coincidence of the timing of the announcement with the FCC's approval of the merger between Comcast and NBCU is just that; a coincidence. The negotiations had been going on long before the FCC's final decision.

Did Olbermann have just cause to think Comcast, once they took over, would can him? Methinks Keith suffers from a bit of paranoia as this Media Decoder post suggests:


Months before Comcast was expected to gain control of NBC Universal, Comcast officials were worried about the perception that they might interfere with MSNBC for political reasons.

One executive, who asked not to be identified because Comcast had instructed employees not to speak about the situation, said the company dreaded the prospect of being blamed if Mr. Olbermann were to quit soon after the takeover.

Does that sound like a company eager to muzzle liberals, especially Olbermann?

I think Olbermann will spend a few months writing for various far left sites while he launches a radio show. The idea that another cable net would hire him is puzzling. CNN wouldn't touch him and Fox hopes he goes away and never comes back. Is there another alternative?

Stay tuned.


RECENT VIDEOS