Obama's claim of Boeing export deal highly exaggerated

Thomas Lifson
Almost the only claim Barack Obama had to get something out of the summit and state dinner honoring Hu Jin-tao turns out to be far less than advertised. Dominic Gates, Seattle Times aerospace reporter, writes:

The deal President Hu signed does not include any new jet orders.

Delivering the formal approval during Hu's visit is designed to make the Chinese government appear responsive to U.S. concerns about the balance of trade.

However, all of the airplanes in the sale were announced and booked by Boeing as firm orders over the past four years. Chinese airlines had already paid nonrefundable deposits and signed contracts for the jets, most of them as far back as 2007.

"The only thing new is (Chinese) government approval," said Boeing spokesman Miles Kotay.

That's pretty typical of Obama: advertise something as a big achievement when it turns out to ahve been accomplished by others.

Hat tip: Herb Meyer

Almost the only claim Barack Obama had to get something out of the summit and state dinner honoring Hu Jin-tao turns out to be far less than advertised. Dominic Gates, Seattle Times aerospace reporter, writes:

The deal President Hu signed does not include any new jet orders.

Delivering the formal approval during Hu's visit is designed to make the Chinese government appear responsive to U.S. concerns about the balance of trade.

However, all of the airplanes in the sale were announced and booked by Boeing as firm orders over the past four years. Chinese airlines had already paid nonrefundable deposits and signed contracts for the jets, most of them as far back as 2007.

"The only thing new is (Chinese) government approval," said Boeing spokesman Miles Kotay.

That's pretty typical of Obama: advertise something as a big achievement when it turns out to ahve been accomplished by others.

Hat tip: Herb Meyer