Indiana tea party targets Lugar in primary

Ralph Alter
At least Evan Bayh was sufficiently in touch with popular Hoosier opinion to recognize that his jig as Senator from Indiana was up. Decades of sucking up to the liberal Washington media and social establishment, however, has rendered RINO Dick Lugar hard of thinking.
Lugar's deep burrowing into the progressive cocoon of D.C., combined with his lofty opinion of his own intellect, has the six-term Indiana Senator and soybean farmer convinced that he knows better than his constituents what is best for Indiana citizens. After all, Lugar is a Rhodes scholar. Perhaps no other resume enhancer, other than matriculating from Harvard, could be a better indicator of the inability to serve the American people.

While serving as mayor of Indianapolis, Lugar earned the sobriquet of "President Richard Nixon's favorite mayor." Three and a half decades in Washington later, Dick Lugar now considers himself Barack Obama's mentor. He couldn't be more out of touch with Indiana citizenry if he had been living in a cave.

Finally the Tea Party is coming after Lefty Lugar. A meeting of representatives from 50 Tea Party groups will meet in Tipton, Indiana on January 22 to strategize and coalesce around a candidate to challenge the RINO incumbent. Lugar sees the challenge coming however, and is determined to cling to his seat.

Lugar met with...tea party supporters for two hours in December to try to convince them he shares their conservative values. It didn't change any minds.

It would seem a tall order to gussy up Lugar's far-from conservative record in a manner palatable to even mild-mannered conservatives. Lugar's support for the DREAM act and the McCain Kennedy Comprehensive Immigration Reform bill, his votes in favor of Obama's obscenely progressive Supreme Court nominees, Kagan and Sotomayor, his support for opening up travel to Cuba, his leading role in support for ethanol subsidies and related crack-pot green energy programs, and his general willingness to cross the aisle on just about any opportunity for liberal media accolades, make Dick Lugar anathema to serious conservatives.

His spokesman, Mark Helmke, remains as arrogant and defiant as his boss. He was quoted "if the (tea party) group wants to hold an anti-Lugar event, that's their business." It will be a tall order to remove the long-time Senator who has a solid approval rating with low-information Hoosiers and cross over votes from Democrats naturally attracted to Lugar's leftist tilt. If the tea party can mount a well-funded campaign, united around a single candidate coupled with a determined effort by the new media to inform the Indiana citizens about how far out of sync with their values Lugar remains, conservatism will have a fighting chance.

 

Ralph Alter is a regular contributor to American Thinker.

At least Evan Bayh was sufficiently in touch with popular Hoosier opinion to recognize that his jig as Senator from Indiana was up. Decades of sucking up to the liberal Washington media and social establishment, however, has rendered RINO Dick Lugar hard of thinking.

Lugar's deep burrowing into the progressive cocoon of D.C., combined with his lofty opinion of his own intellect, has the six-term Indiana Senator and soybean farmer convinced that he knows better than his constituents what is best for Indiana citizens. After all, Lugar is a Rhodes scholar. Perhaps no other resume enhancer, other than matriculating from Harvard, could be a better indicator of the inability to serve the American people.

While serving as mayor of Indianapolis, Lugar earned the sobriquet of "President Richard Nixon's favorite mayor." Three and a half decades in Washington later, Dick Lugar now considers himself Barack Obama's mentor. He couldn't be more out of touch with Indiana citizenry if he had been living in a cave.

Finally the Tea Party is coming after Lefty Lugar. A meeting of representatives from 50 Tea Party groups will meet in Tipton, Indiana on January 22 to strategize and coalesce around a candidate to challenge the RINO incumbent. Lugar sees the challenge coming however, and is determined to cling to his seat.

Lugar met with...tea party supporters for two hours in December to try to convince them he shares their conservative values. It didn't change any minds.

It would seem a tall order to gussy up Lugar's far-from conservative record in a manner palatable to even mild-mannered conservatives. Lugar's support for the DREAM act and the McCain Kennedy Comprehensive Immigration Reform bill, his votes in favor of Obama's obscenely progressive Supreme Court nominees, Kagan and Sotomayor, his support for opening up travel to Cuba, his leading role in support for ethanol subsidies and related crack-pot green energy programs, and his general willingness to cross the aisle on just about any opportunity for liberal media accolades, make Dick Lugar anathema to serious conservatives.

His spokesman, Mark Helmke, remains as arrogant and defiant as his boss. He was quoted "if the (tea party) group wants to hold an anti-Lugar event, that's their business." It will be a tall order to remove the long-time Senator who has a solid approval rating with low-information Hoosiers and cross over votes from Democrats naturally attracted to Lugar's leftist tilt. If the tea party can mount a well-funded campaign, united around a single candidate coupled with a determined effort by the new media to inform the Indiana citizens about how far out of sync with their values Lugar remains, conservatism will have a fighting chance.

 

Ralph Alter is a regular contributor to American Thinker.