Egypt protestors plan million man march for tomorrow

Rick Moran
Can they pull it off? It's hard to know how organized they still are with the internet down, mobile phone service limited, and many of their leaders in jail.

Al Jazeera reports:


Egyptian protesters have called for a massive demonstration and a rolling general strike on Tuesday in a bid to force out president Hosni Mubarak from power. The so-called April 6 Movement said it plans to have more than one million people on the streets of the capital Cairo, as anti-government sentiment reaches a fever pitch.

The call came as Mubarak swore in a new cabinet in an attempt to defuse ongoing demonstrations across the country.

But opposition groups say personnel changes will not placate them and have said they will continue until the president steps down.

"The whole regime must come down," Hassan, a construction worker and protester told the Reuters news agency.

"We do not want anyone from Mubarak's retinue in the new government, which the people will choose. We want a civil government run by the people themselves."

That kind of sentiment means that the will of the protestors is still strong. Trying to get a million people into the streets though, is a daunting challenge and, of course, they run the risk of looking weak if they fall short of that number.

Still, even half that number would show Mubarak that his time is up and he should move out.




Can they pull it off? It's hard to know how organized they still are with the internet down, mobile phone service limited, and many of their leaders in jail.

Al Jazeera reports:


Egyptian protesters have called for a massive demonstration and a rolling general strike on Tuesday in a bid to force out president Hosni Mubarak from power.

The so-called April 6 Movement said it plans to have more than one million people on the streets of the capital Cairo, as anti-government sentiment reaches a fever pitch.

The call came as Mubarak swore in a new cabinet in an attempt to defuse ongoing demonstrations across the country.

But opposition groups say personnel changes will not placate them and have said they will continue until the president steps down.

"The whole regime must come down," Hassan, a construction worker and protester told the Reuters news agency.

"We do not want anyone from Mubarak's retinue in the new government, which the people will choose. We want a civil government run by the people themselves."

That kind of sentiment means that the will of the protestors is still strong. Trying to get a million people into the streets though, is a daunting challenge and, of course, they run the risk of looking weak if they fall short of that number.

Still, even half that number would show Mubarak that his time is up and he should move out.