NYC Sanitation Dept. Bosses: Guilty of Manslaughter?

Gene Schwimmer
Yesterday (December 29), New York's Daily News reported the story of a baby that was born - and died - in the lobby of a Brooklyn apartment building after waiting nine hours for police and fire personnel to respond to her emergency call.  Certainly, an extraordinary number of emergencies resulting from that day's blizzard accounted in large part for the delay.  But certainly, too, were the nearly impassible roads (as this writer, a New Yorker, can attest) and the Sanitation's slow progress in clearing them.

Now, courtesy of the New York Post, comes evidence that that slowness might have been deliberate:

Selfish Sanitation Department bosses from the snow-slammed outer boroughs ordered their drivers to snarl the blizzard cleanup to protest budget cuts -- a disastrous move that turned streets into a minefield for emergency-services vehicles, The Post has learned.

And contributed to the death of newborn babe?

This writer is not a lawyer and is only stating his personal opinion (so no libel lawsuits, please).  But if (a) these "Sanitation Department Bosses" can be identified and (b) a grand jury can be convinced that the "Sanitation Department Bosses" did, in fact, order the slowdown, with reckless disregard of the potential consequences, could someone be guilty of at least negligent homicide, manslaughter or at least accessories to one of the two?

Should the District Attorney investigate?



Gene Schwimmer is the author of
The Christian State.

Yesterday (December 29), New York's Daily News reported the story of a baby that was born - and died - in the lobby of a Brooklyn apartment building after waiting nine hours for police and fire personnel to respond to her emergency call.  Certainly, an extraordinary number of emergencies resulting from that day's blizzard accounted in large part for the delay.  But certainly, too, were the nearly impassible roads (as this writer, a New Yorker, can attest) and the Sanitation's slow progress in clearing them.

Now, courtesy of the New York Post, comes evidence that that slowness might have been deliberate:

Selfish Sanitation Department bosses from the snow-slammed outer boroughs ordered their drivers to snarl the blizzard cleanup to protest budget cuts -- a disastrous move that turned streets into a minefield for emergency-services vehicles, The Post has learned.

And contributed to the death of newborn babe?

This writer is not a lawyer and is only stating his personal opinion (so no libel lawsuits, please).  But if (a) these "Sanitation Department Bosses" can be identified and (b) a grand jury can be convinced that the "Sanitation Department Bosses" did, in fact, order the slowdown, with reckless disregard of the potential consequences, could someone be guilty of at least negligent homicide, manslaughter or at least accessories to one of the two?

Should the District Attorney investigate?



Gene Schwimmer is the author of
The Christian State.