Iran getting desperate over Stuxnet

James H. Fetzer and J.R. Dunn
Just call me Nostradamus. Less than twelve hours after my cyberwar piece "Wikileaks, Stuxnet, Cyberwar, and Obama"  appeared on AT, Fox News published an exclusive report on the Stuxnet worm that confirms most of my speculations concerning the worm's as yet uncertain capabilities.
  • Despite official denials, Stuxnet remains functional within the Iranian nuclear IT system, rendering it effectively inactive and bringing operations to a halt.
  • Along with the original IT warhead designed to take down Iran's uranium processing centrifuges, Stuxnet also featured a second "mod", designed to disable turbine systems.
  • That version has subverted the reactor at Bushehr, curtailing operations for the foreseeable future.
  • The Stuxnet worm is designed to hide in network backup systems where it is difficult to track down.
  • One of the scientists assassinated by a motorcycle hit team on November 29 was in charge of the Stuxnet disinfection effort.

Iranian desperation is clearly revealed by the number of inquiries to American information security sites dealing with Stuxnet. On some sites, Iranian queries account for a majority of users. The Iranians have reached the end of their string and are grasping at any possible solution, even if it has to come from the Great Satan. Now to deal with Julian A.

As for me, I promise to use my powers only for good.
Just call me Nostradamus. Less than twelve hours after my cyberwar piece "Wikileaks, Stuxnet, Cyberwar, and Obama"  appeared on AT, Fox News published an exclusive report on the Stuxnet worm that confirms most of my speculations concerning the worm's as yet uncertain capabilities.
  • Despite official denials, Stuxnet remains functional within the Iranian nuclear IT system, rendering it effectively inactive and bringing operations to a halt.
  • Along with the original IT warhead designed to take down Iran's uranium processing centrifuges, Stuxnet also featured a second "mod", designed to disable turbine systems.
  • That version has subverted the reactor at Bushehr, curtailing operations for the foreseeable future.
  • The Stuxnet worm is designed to hide in network backup systems where it is difficult to track down.
  • One of the scientists assassinated by a motorcycle hit team on November 29 was in charge of the Stuxnet disinfection effort.

Iranian desperation is clearly revealed by the number of inquiries to American information security sites dealing with Stuxnet. On some sites, Iranian queries account for a majority of users. The Iranians have reached the end of their string and are grasping at any possible solution, even if it has to come from the Great Satan. Now to deal with Julian A.

As for me, I promise to use my powers only for good.