The Luxurious Fairmont Hotel You're Not Allowed to Visit

The Fairmount hotel chain offers some of the most luxurious hostelries on the planet, including the new Makkah Clock Royal Tower hotel in Mecca, adjacent to the holy of holies, the Kaaba. Because it is in Mecca, infidels like me (and most AT readers) are not allowed. Well, at least we know now what passes muster among high end hoteliers in the era of petrodollars.



I vividly remember the demonization suffered by companies that dealt with South Africa in the bad old days, yet a major hospitality chain feels no apparent compunction in offering an apartheid property that excludes non-Muslims. If I am unwelcome at one Fairmont property, I feel unwelcome at them all, and will be avoiding them from now on. Ritz Carlton and Four Seasons offer comparable facilities and service, and as far as I know treat infidels with the same respect they treat Mulsims.

Doug Ross has a great post, with lots of views of what has to be one of the most bizarre buildings in the world -- it looks like someone grafted London's Big Ben onto Cleveland's



1920s-era Terminal Tower complex, and plopped it down next to  the minaret-strewn  mosque, where every year millions gather (and usually at least a few are trampled to death).

Doug also catches some hilarious promotional material. In corporate America, sometimes  when such a goof appears, heads will roll. This being Saudi Arabia, we can't discount the possibility that the metaphor will become literal.








Update - this makes sense: The Fairmont chain is owned by Saudi Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal's Kingdom Holdings.

The Fairmount hotel chain offers some of the most luxurious hostelries on the planet, including the new Makkah Clock Royal Tower hotel in Mecca, adjacent to the holy of holies, the Kaaba. Because it is in Mecca, infidels like me (and most AT readers) are not allowed. Well, at least we know now what passes muster among high end hoteliers in the era of petrodollars.



I vividly remember the demonization suffered by companies that dealt with South Africa in the bad old days, yet a major hospitality chain feels no apparent compunction in offering an apartheid property that excludes non-Muslims. If I am unwelcome at one Fairmont property, I feel unwelcome at them all, and will be avoiding them from now on. Ritz Carlton and Four Seasons offer comparable facilities and service, and as far as I know treat infidels with the same respect they treat Mulsims.

Doug Ross has a great post, with lots of views of what has to be one of the most bizarre buildings in the world -- it looks like someone grafted London's Big Ben onto Cleveland's



1920s-era Terminal Tower complex, and plopped it down next to  the minaret-strewn  mosque, where every year millions gather (and usually at least a few are trampled to death).

Doug also catches some hilarious promotional material. In corporate America, sometimes  when such a goof appears, heads will roll. This being Saudi Arabia, we can't discount the possibility that the metaphor will become literal.








Update - this makes sense: The Fairmont chain is owned by Saudi Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal's Kingdom Holdings.

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