Marine life flourishing in Gulf

The doomsayers were wrong in their predictions of an ecological disaster from the Deepwater Horizon oil well disaster. Researchers form the Dauphin Island Sea Lab in Alabama have discovered that there has been a population explosion, because of the fishing moratorium. Lou Dolinar writes in National Review Online:

Even the researchers themselves, however, were surprised by the results. "We expected there to be virtually no fish out there based on all the reports we were getting about the toxicity of the dispersant and the toxicity of the hydrocarbons, and reports that hypoxia [low oxygen] had been created as a result of the oil and dispersant," says John Valentine, who directed the study. "In every way you can imagine, it should have been a hostile environment for fish and crabs; our collection showed that was not the case."

Also surprising was how quickly the populations grew. "In the cosmic scheme of things, a matter of four or five months led to this huge difference in everything, sharks, fish of all forms, even the juvenile fish found in sea-grass beds. That's a pretty interesting and unanticipated outcome, I would say," says Valentine. The surge is so robust, he says, that it may be impossible to determine whether the oil spill has had any effect on sea life at all.

When the media and greenies were hyping the purported catastrophic effects of the oil spill, the ignored the simple fact that oil seepage into the Gulf is a natural phenomenon, whether or not there is any drilling. The ecology of the Gulf includes a regular diet of oil -- that is eaten by bacteria, which end up as food for plankton, which end of as food for fish. The Gulf eats oil, in other words.

The fishermen of the Gulf have still suffered, of course -- at the hands of the media and government.

Of course you will not see the media trumpeting this good news. They are too heavily invested in the phony disaster narrative. For the truth, Americans have to rely on the conservative blogosphere and talk radio.
The doomsayers were wrong in their predictions of an ecological disaster from the Deepwater Horizon oil well disaster. Researchers form the Dauphin Island Sea Lab in Alabama have discovered that there has been a population explosion, because of the fishing moratorium. Lou Dolinar writes in National Review Online:

Even the researchers themselves, however, were surprised by the results. "We expected there to be virtually no fish out there based on all the reports we were getting about the toxicity of the dispersant and the toxicity of the hydrocarbons, and reports that hypoxia [low oxygen] had been created as a result of the oil and dispersant," says John Valentine, who directed the study. "In every way you can imagine, it should have been a hostile environment for fish and crabs; our collection showed that was not the case."

Also surprising was how quickly the populations grew. "In the cosmic scheme of things, a matter of four or five months led to this huge difference in everything, sharks, fish of all forms, even the juvenile fish found in sea-grass beds. That's a pretty interesting and unanticipated outcome, I would say," says Valentine. The surge is so robust, he says, that it may be impossible to determine whether the oil spill has had any effect on sea life at all.

When the media and greenies were hyping the purported catastrophic effects of the oil spill, the ignored the simple fact that oil seepage into the Gulf is a natural phenomenon, whether or not there is any drilling. The ecology of the Gulf includes a regular diet of oil -- that is eaten by bacteria, which end up as food for plankton, which end of as food for fish. The Gulf eats oil, in other words.

The fishermen of the Gulf have still suffered, of course -- at the hands of the media and government.

Of course you will not see the media trumpeting this good news. They are too heavily invested in the phony disaster narrative. For the truth, Americans have to rely on the conservative blogosphere and talk radio.

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