Dressing for Success--Iranian style

Dressing for success--or one's life--is quite different in an Islamic country from what we're accustomed to here.

In Iran, after the 1979 revolution, ties were banned as too reminiscent of the decadent European and American culture. Granted there are many men in America who believe ties are anachronistic, uncomfortable and unnecessary but would have felt a government decree declaring them illegal too intrusive. And unAmerican.


But now Iranian Islamists have a tie proudly advertising their beliefs that is most acceptable to Iranian authorities according to
a report in Israel's Ynet News. A tie in the shape of an Iranian holy man's sword, emblazoned with quotes from Mohammed, the inventor of Islam, is now available and just might become the newest fashion rage for men in that country.

Then again, maybe not.
Female Islamic fashion hasn't been forgotten in Iran. The younger girls now have a doll, Fatima, properly swathed in proper Iranian style, the very opposite of the corrupt Barbie that "westerners are promoting bad veiling and not wearing the hijab."

Obviously American Girl dolls, even those modestly dressed in the plain, sturdy clothes of the frontier wouldn't be acceptable in Iran.

The more mature Iranian female hasn't been forgotten either. An Iranian company has created, "[N]ew software which is meant to promote the wearing of the hijab."

[T]he software includes videos of Islamic fashion, speeches on wearing hijab and an instant messenger service."

American fashion magazines and their online versions--take note.

 



Dressing for success--or one's life--is quite different in an Islamic country from what we're accustomed to here.

In Iran, after the 1979 revolution, ties were banned as too reminiscent of the decadent European and American culture. Granted there are many men in America who believe ties are anachronistic, uncomfortable and unnecessary but would have felt a government decree declaring them illegal too intrusive. And unAmerican.


But now Iranian Islamists have a tie proudly advertising their beliefs that is most acceptable to Iranian authorities according to
a report in Israel's Ynet News. A tie in the shape of an Iranian holy man's sword, emblazoned with quotes from Mohammed, the inventor of Islam, is now available and just might become the newest fashion rage for men in that country.

Then again, maybe not.

Female Islamic fashion hasn't been forgotten in Iran. The younger girls now have a doll, Fatima, properly swathed in proper Iranian style, the very opposite of the corrupt Barbie that "westerners are promoting bad veiling and not wearing the hijab."

Obviously American Girl dolls, even those modestly dressed in the plain, sturdy clothes of the frontier wouldn't be acceptable in Iran.

The more mature Iranian female hasn't been forgotten either. An Iranian company has created, "[N]ew software which is meant to promote the wearing of the hijab."

[T]he software includes videos of Islamic fashion, speeches on wearing hijab and an instant messenger service."

American fashion magazines and their online versions--take note.

 



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