Rachel Corrie's parents demand 'justice' from Israel

You remember Rachel Corrie, the left-wing terror advocate who suffered a major deficit of common sense? On March 16, 2003, the 24-year-old American got herself killed when she stood in front of an Israel Defense Forces bulldozer conducting anti-terror operations in Gaza -- destroying tunnels used for weapons smuggling.

Corrie has since become a patron saint of the Israel-hating left. And within the coming week, her parents will be proceeding with a civil suit in Israel's courts against the IDF, according to a sympathetic article about them and their misguided daughter written by Diaa Hadid of the Associated Press. Craig and Cindy Corrie are seeking an "apology" and the chance to "look their daughter's killer in the eye," according to the piece.

Corrie's parents and her rabid supporters dispute the IDF's claim that her death was an accident.

Here's a photo, incidentally, of Rachel Corrie burning a mock American flag in Gaza, her face contorted with rage. It's a photo that never seems to accompany sympathetic articles about the pro-Palestinian radical in the mainstream media.

Underscoring her patron saint status to the international left, a play written was written about her based on her writing. "My Name is Rachel Corrie" was a big hit in London -- or Londonistan as that city is informally called.

In April 2005, the play opened "at London's prestigious Royal Court, a venue named by The New York Times 'as the most important theater in Europe'," observed journalist Tom Gross.

Corrie's parents, for their part, have for years been demanding "justice" in Israel's courts, while simultaneously standing up for the Palestinian cause and bringing attention to what they regard as "Palestinian suffering."

Earlier, the Corrie's unsuccessfully sued Caterpillar Inc. -- the U.S. company that made the IDF bulldozer that ran over their daughter. Caterpillar, they claimed, had been violating international law by facilitating Israel's alleged human rights violations.

The left's worship of Corrie, of course, has no room for victims of Palestinian terror, as Gross noted in a piece about the "cult of Rachel Corrie" and the victims of Palestinian terror.

In "The Forgotten Rachel's," Gross describes the hypocrisy of Rachel Corrie, her parents, and their devoted supporters; not to mention the anti-Israeli bias of the mainstream media in respect to its coverage of Rachel Corrie. Specifically, Gross points out that "many of the articles about Corrie...are not really about the young American activist who died in such tragic circumstances. They are about promoting a hate-filled and glaringly one-sided view of Israel."

Israel's courts, for their part, appear to be bending over backwards to accommodate the Corries, which is ironic given Rachel Corrie's hatred of Israel, the Middle East's only democracy.

Imagine parents whose daughter was murdered by Palestinian authorities getting a comparable level of justice in a court room in the West Bank or Gaza.
You remember Rachel Corrie, the left-wing terror advocate who suffered a major deficit of common sense? On March 16, 2003, the 24-year-old American got herself killed when she stood in front of an Israel Defense Forces bulldozer conducting anti-terror operations in Gaza -- destroying tunnels used for weapons smuggling.

Corrie has since become a patron saint of the Israel-hating left. And within the coming week, her parents will be proceeding with a civil suit in Israel's courts against the IDF, according to a sympathetic article about them and their misguided daughter written by Diaa Hadid of the Associated Press. Craig and Cindy Corrie are seeking an "apology" and the chance to "look their daughter's killer in the eye," according to the piece.

Corrie's parents and her rabid supporters dispute the IDF's claim that her death was an accident.

Here's a photo, incidentally, of Rachel Corrie burning a mock American flag in Gaza, her face contorted with rage. It's a photo that never seems to accompany sympathetic articles about the pro-Palestinian radical in the mainstream media.

Underscoring her patron saint status to the international left, a play written was written about her based on her writing. "My Name is Rachel Corrie" was a big hit in London -- or Londonistan as that city is informally called.

In April 2005, the play opened "at London's prestigious Royal Court, a venue named by The New York Times 'as the most important theater in Europe'," observed journalist Tom Gross.

Corrie's parents, for their part, have for years been demanding "justice" in Israel's courts, while simultaneously standing up for the Palestinian cause and bringing attention to what they regard as "Palestinian suffering."

Earlier, the Corrie's unsuccessfully sued Caterpillar Inc. -- the U.S. company that made the IDF bulldozer that ran over their daughter. Caterpillar, they claimed, had been violating international law by facilitating Israel's alleged human rights violations.

The left's worship of Corrie, of course, has no room for victims of Palestinian terror, as Gross noted in a piece about the "cult of Rachel Corrie" and the victims of Palestinian terror.

In "The Forgotten Rachel's," Gross describes the hypocrisy of Rachel Corrie, her parents, and their devoted supporters; not to mention the anti-Israeli bias of the mainstream media in respect to its coverage of Rachel Corrie. Specifically, Gross points out that "many of the articles about Corrie...are not really about the young American activist who died in such tragic circumstances. They are about promoting a hate-filled and glaringly one-sided view of Israel."

Israel's courts, for their part, appear to be bending over backwards to accommodate the Corries, which is ironic given Rachel Corrie's hatred of Israel, the Middle East's only democracy.

Imagine parents whose daughter was murdered by Palestinian authorities getting a comparable level of justice in a court room in the West Bank or Gaza.

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