Oxymoron: A smart liberal?

G. Wesley Clark, MD

Mickey Kaus may be a liberal, but he certainly doesn’t fit the stereotype of a narcissistic pseudo-intellectual whose mind is unconfused by facts.  Kaus writes in Newsweek blog regarding Obama’s latest deduction that it is the irrational fears of confused voters that have led them to misunderstand him.  According to Obama’s statement:

"Part of the reason that our politics seems so tough right now and facts and science and argument does not seem to be winning the day all the time is because we're hardwired not to always think clearly when we're scared,"

Kaus likens Obama’s new critical analysis to his previous gaffe disaster, about Pennsylvania voters who "cling-to-guns-and-God" , and nails the irony:

But Obama's talk Saturday night wasn't as bad as his San Francisco lecture. It was worse, in this sense: It's one thing to say those poor people in Pennsylvania are hostile to gay rights, say, because all their "jobs have been gone now for 25 years and nothing's replaced them"—and that they'll change when they get the jobs back.  It's another thing to say those poor people will change when they get their jobs back when you've had two years to get them their jobs back and have conspicuously failed. At that point, blaming "false consciousness" becomes a semi-delusional way of dancing around your own inability to remove the root of that false consciousness. A little humility is in order. If true humility is unavailable, false humility will do.

(italics in original)

 The deeper connection, that Obama has not yet recognized, is that Americans who are scared and fearful are reacting to what he is doing to systematically destroy our liberty and our country. 

But Kaus also expresses hope: 

for the first time, he's looking like a one-termer, even if the jobs start to come back.

Mickey Kaus may be a liberal, but he certainly doesn’t fit the stereotype of a narcissistic pseudo-intellectual whose mind is unconfused by facts.  Kaus writes in Newsweek blog regarding Obama’s latest deduction that it is the irrational fears of confused voters that have led them to misunderstand him.  According to Obama’s statement:

"Part of the reason that our politics seems so tough right now and facts and science and argument does not seem to be winning the day all the time is because we're hardwired not to always think clearly when we're scared,"

Kaus likens Obama’s new critical analysis to his previous gaffe disaster, about Pennsylvania voters who "cling-to-guns-and-God" , and nails the irony:

But Obama's talk Saturday night wasn't as bad as his San Francisco lecture. It was worse, in this sense: It's one thing to say those poor people in Pennsylvania are hostile to gay rights, say, because all their "jobs have been gone now for 25 years and nothing's replaced them"—and that they'll change when they get the jobs back.  It's another thing to say those poor people will change when they get their jobs back when you've had two years to get them their jobs back and have conspicuously failed. At that point, blaming "false consciousness" becomes a semi-delusional way of dancing around your own inability to remove the root of that false consciousness. A little humility is in order. If true humility is unavailable, false humility will do.

(italics in original)

 The deeper connection, that Obama has not yet recognized, is that Americans who are scared and fearful are reacting to what he is doing to systematically destroy our liberty and our country. 

But Kaus also expresses hope: 

for the first time, he's looking like a one-termer, even if the jobs start to come back.