On our way to Banana Republic status

Rick Moran
Reuters is reporting that the United States is well on its way to achieving the status of Banana Republic when it comes to corruption in government:

The United States has dropped out of the "top 20" in a global league table of least corrupt nations, tarnished by financial scandals and the influence of money in politics, Transparency International said on Tuesday.

Somalia was judged the most corrupt country, followed by Myanmar and Afghanistan at joint second-worst and then by Iraq, in the Berlin-based watchdog TI's annual corruption perceptions index (CPI).The United States fell to 22nd from 19th last year, with its CPI score dropping to 7.1 from 7.5 in the 178-nation index, which is based on independent surveys on corruption.

This was the lowest score awarded to the United States in the index's 15-year history and also the first time it had fallen out of the top 20.

In the Americas, this put the United States behind Canada in sixth place, Barbados at 17th and Chile in 21st place.

Just think. If we clean our act up a little bit, we can top Chile! That's sounds like a goal our president can aspire to.

For the record, Denmark, Singapore, and New Zealand topped the list of honest countries.

 



Reuters is reporting that the United States is well on its way to achieving the status of Banana Republic when it comes to corruption in government:

The United States has dropped out of the "top 20" in a global league table of least corrupt nations, tarnished by financial scandals and the influence of money in politics, Transparency International said on Tuesday.

Somalia was judged the most corrupt country, followed by Myanmar and Afghanistan at joint second-worst and then by Iraq, in the Berlin-based watchdog TI's annual corruption perceptions index (CPI).

The United States fell to 22nd from 19th last year, with its CPI score dropping to 7.1 from 7.5 in the 178-nation index, which is based on independent surveys on corruption.

This was the lowest score awarded to the United States in the index's 15-year history and also the first time it had fallen out of the top 20.

In the Americas, this put the United States behind Canada in sixth place, Barbados at 17th and Chile in 21st place.

Just think. If we clean our act up a little bit, we can top Chile! That's sounds like a goal our president can aspire to.

For the record, Denmark, Singapore, and New Zealand topped the list of honest countries.