Fox News Celebrates an Anniversary

James V. Capua
As Mediaite puts it, "14 years ago today, Rupert Murdoch and Roger Ailes launched the Fox News Channel-a network that has dominated cable news since 2002, when it overtook CNN." No doubt they are not celebrating this anniversary at the White House.
In 2008 the Legacy Media summoned every last ounce of strength it could muster for one final, but Pyrrhic, victory. By betraying their craft they helped elect Barack Obama, at the cost of alienation from their audience and financial disaster.

Now a New Media, Fox on cable, a remarkable array of talent and wit on what used to be poor old am radio, and, of course on the Internet has taken the field, and is profiting mightily from the failures of the old. But one word of caution here for Republicans: The New Media will be determined, in this election cycle and subsequent ones, to preserve the good name and profitability of their franchise. This means that Republican candidates and their positions must be able to stand up to serious scrutiny on cable and the web. No one should count on secret directives from Roger Ailes to describe Tim Pawlenty as a hunk, nor Haley Barbour as "big-boned." Rush Limbaugh will take the laughs wherever he can get them, and Andrew Breitbart will not allow himself again to be accused of selective editing.

If Republicans expect good press from the New Media, they must understand that it will only come the old fashioned way-they will have to earn it.


As Mediaite puts it, "14 years ago today, Rupert Murdoch and Roger Ailes launched the Fox News Channel-a network that has dominated cable news since 2002, when it overtook CNN." No doubt they are not celebrating this anniversary at the White House.
In 2008 the Legacy Media summoned every last ounce of strength it could muster for one final, but Pyrrhic, victory. By betraying their craft they helped elect Barack Obama, at the cost of alienation from their audience and financial disaster.

Now a New Media, Fox on cable, a remarkable array of talent and wit on what used to be poor old am radio, and, of course on the Internet has taken the field, and is profiting mightily from the failures of the old. But one word of caution here for Republicans: The New Media will be determined, in this election cycle and subsequent ones, to preserve the good name and profitability of their franchise. This means that Republican candidates and their positions must be able to stand up to serious scrutiny on cable and the web. No one should count on secret directives from Roger Ailes to describe Tim Pawlenty as a hunk, nor Haley Barbour as "big-boned." Rush Limbaugh will take the laughs wherever he can get them, and Andrew Breitbart will not allow himself again to be accused of selective editing.

If Republicans expect good press from the New Media, they must understand that it will only come the old fashioned way-they will have to earn it.