Ads touting health care reform may break the law

Rick Moran
The Obama administration says the ads are for information purposes only. But they are spending $3 million to tout the program during an election season.

"Non-political?"


The Obama administration has spent approximately $3 million on TV ads discussing the benefits of health care reform this month - three times what was spent by pro-reform candidates and groups but almost nothing compared to the $21 million spent on anti-reform ads. The Department of Health and Human Services insists that the ads are not political and that the spending is in line with what the agency has done in the past to advise seniors about the open enrollment period for Medicare Advantage and prescription drug coverage plans, which begins Nov. 15. But the ads discuss benefits specific to the Democrats' health care reform law, such as the closing of the prescription drug 'doughnut hole,' the 50 percent discount on drugs purchased in the coverage gap and the new coverage for an annual wellness visit, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services spokesman Tony Salters said.

There is nothing that isn't political this close to the election and it is dishonest to say otherwise. One can only hope that reminding people about this boondoggle makes them less likely to vote for the people who brought it on the country in the first place.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky

The Obama administration says the ads are for information purposes only. But they are spending $3 million to tout the program during an election season.

"Non-political?"


The Obama administration has spent approximately $3 million on TV ads discussing the benefits of health care reform this month - three times what was spent by pro-reform candidates and groups but almost nothing compared to the $21 million spent on anti-reform ads. The Department of Health and Human Services insists that the ads are not political and that the spending is in line with what the agency has done in the past to advise seniors about the open enrollment period for Medicare Advantage and prescription drug coverage plans, which begins Nov. 15. But the ads discuss benefits specific to the Democrats' health care reform law, such as the closing of the prescription drug 'doughnut hole,' the 50 percent discount on drugs purchased in the coverage gap and the new coverage for an annual wellness visit, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services spokesman Tony Salters said.

There is nothing that isn't political this close to the election and it is dishonest to say otherwise. One can only hope that reminding people about this boondoggle makes them less likely to vote for the people who brought it on the country in the first place.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky