Those, like, totally weird constitutionalists

Mark J. Fitzgibbons
Dahlia Lithwick, who sports both a Yale undergrad and Stanford law degree, is senior editor and legal guru at Slate magazine. Yesterday she wrote this comment, which I find stunning:
I have been fascinated by Christine O'Donnell's constitutional worldview since her debate with her opponent Chris Coons last week. O'Donnell explained that "when I go to Washington, D.C., the litmus test by which I cast my vote for every piece of legislation that comes across my desk will be whether or not it is constitutional." How weird is that, I thought. Isn't it a court's job to determine whether or not something is, in fact, constitutional? And isn't that sort of provided for in, well, the Constitution?

Again, you just can't make up this material the left feeds us. I'll let reader comments take it from here.
Dahlia Lithwick, who sports both a Yale undergrad and Stanford law degree, is senior editor and legal guru at Slate magazine. Yesterday she wrote this comment, which I find stunning:
I have been fascinated by Christine O'Donnell's constitutional worldview since her debate with her opponent Chris Coons last week. O'Donnell explained that "when I go to Washington, D.C., the litmus test by which I cast my vote for every piece of legislation that comes across my desk will be whether or not it is constitutional." How weird is that, I thought. Isn't it a court's job to determine whether or not something is, in fact, constitutional? And isn't that sort of provided for in, well, the Constitution?

Again, you just can't make up this material the left feeds us. I'll let reader comments take it from here.