Government scientist: assume blame for humans in extreme weather events

Peter von Buol
Objective science is thrown out the door with much "climate research. We've always suspected so, but now a government scientist admits the game.

This is part of an article in the British Magazine, New Scientist:

"WHEN extreme weather strikes, such as the floods in Pakistan, the null hypothesis is to assume that humans have not played a role, then figure out if they did.

That's the opposite of what should be done, argues Kevin Trenberth of the US National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. We should assume global warming plays a role in every climate event, then ask whether that role is a significant one. The view is likely to be controversial, but a government-convened meeting last week suggests that it is gaining favour."




Objective science is thrown out the door with much "climate research. We've always suspected so, but now a government scientist admits the game.

This is part of an article in the British Magazine, New Scientist:

"WHEN extreme weather strikes, such as the floods in Pakistan, the null hypothesis is to assume that humans have not played a role, then figure out if they did.

That's the opposite of what should be done, argues Kevin Trenberth of the US National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. We should assume global warming plays a role in every climate event, then ask whether that role is a significant one. The view is likely to be controversial, but a government-convened meeting last week suggests that it is gaining favour."