Will Gibbs be thrown under the bus?

Solicitor of ‘spin', Robert Gibbs, recently answered some questions a bit too honestly for the President's likes.  Gibbs, well known for his ability to get the President out of hot water, found himself doing just the opposite.  The Press Secretary took aim at the "professional left" when he suggested that they be "drug-tested" for their despondency towards President Obama's not-left-enough agenda.  Gibbs further mocked the group by saying they won't be satisfied until the Pentagon is abolished. 

So the question is now: did he go too far?  With mid-term elections lurking around the corner many White House officials now know the fragile nature of the ice on which they stand.  While both Gibbs' camp and the While House are both saying his job is secure, only time will tell what repercussions his comments will have.  The Washington Post has more:

"Inartful," Gibbs later called his comments, acknowledging that they were the result of too much cable-television watching.

But not, necessarily, wrong.

Gibbs canceled his scheduled appearance at the regular White House press briefing Tuesday after the morning scuffle over his words. Aides chalked it up to a sore throat.

So his deputy, Bill Burton, took the podium, as he has with more frequency. He said there was "no danger" in Gibbs stepping down, but he clearly identified his boss's problem.

"I think what Gibbs was doing was having one conversation with one reporter and, in response to some questions about frustration, just answered honestly," Burton said.

Asked during Wednesday's briefing whether he should resign over the comments, Gibbs said (with a scratchy throat) that he's "not leaving."

"There's no truth to the rumor I've added an inflatable exit to my office," he said.

 

 

Solicitor of ‘spin', Robert Gibbs, recently answered some questions a bit too honestly for the President's likes.  Gibbs, well known for his ability to get the President out of hot water, found himself doing just the opposite.  The Press Secretary took aim at the "professional left" when he suggested that they be "drug-tested" for their despondency towards President Obama's not-left-enough agenda.  Gibbs further mocked the group by saying they won't be satisfied until the Pentagon is abolished. 

So the question is now: did he go too far?  With mid-term elections lurking around the corner many White House officials now know the fragile nature of the ice on which they stand.  While both Gibbs' camp and the While House are both saying his job is secure, only time will tell what repercussions his comments will have.  The Washington Post has more:

"Inartful," Gibbs later called his comments, acknowledging that they were the result of too much cable-television watching.

But not, necessarily, wrong.

Gibbs canceled his scheduled appearance at the regular White House press briefing Tuesday after the morning scuffle over his words. Aides chalked it up to a sore throat.

So his deputy, Bill Burton, took the podium, as he has with more frequency. He said there was "no danger" in Gibbs stepping down, but he clearly identified his boss's problem.

"I think what Gibbs was doing was having one conversation with one reporter and, in response to some questions about frustration, just answered honestly," Burton said.

Asked during Wednesday's briefing whether he should resign over the comments, Gibbs said (with a scratchy throat) that he's "not leaving."

"There's no truth to the rumor I've added an inflatable exit to my office," he said.

 

 

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