Obama to reset his image

Jeannie DeAngelis
Let's face it, Obama promoted himself as the be-all and end-all.  Until recently, whenever Barack talked about Barack, the message was that the world has never and will never see anyone quite like the "one we've been waiting for."

Eighteen months after endless television appearances, a gazillion magazine covers, and hours upon hours of unending rhetoric, aides to the President realize it might be time to "downsize [Obama's] exposure" because the world is quickly concluding that America's messiah has feet of clay.

Apparently, Obama didn't believe he'd fail, or he thought that if he did, he could blame someone else. A stunningly inexperienced Obama swore he could fix everything from a lagging economy to a volatile Middle East. Much to his surprise, Barack realized being champion at playing Battleship and flashing around Monopoly money does not prepare a person to administrate the most powerful office in the world.

In an article entitled "Obama the Velcro President," Peter Nicholas and Janet Hook maintain "If Ronald Reagan was the classic Teflon president, Barack Obama is made of Velcro."

Seems Obama's incompetency is sticking to his Prada suit like lint on Velcro.

The quandary in which Obama finds himself is not surprising, especially after his image was furthered on the premise that he was a messianic gift to the world whose coming would solve every dilemma.

Republican political strategist Eddie Mahe claims Obama's "favorite pronoun is 'I.' When you position yourself as being all things to all people, the ultimate controller and decision maker with the capacity to fix anything, you set yourself up to be blamed when it doesn't get fixed or things happen."

America's marketing creation now finds himself ill-equipped but still "on the hook to repair the Gulf Coast oil spill disaster, stabilize Afghanistan, help fix Greece's ailing economy and do right by Shirley Sherrod, the Agriculture Department official fired as a result of a misleading fragment of videotape."

In two years Obama, an expert at pointing fingers, was a major contributor to the culture of censure.  Try as he might to deflect personal culpability, the nation Obama taught to blame now blames him. 

A pressured and humiliated Obama recently tried to "rip off the Velcro veneer. In a revealing moment during the oil spill crisis, he reminded Americans that his powers aren't ‘limitless.'" Barry modestly apologized to Louisiana residents, admitting for the first and only time in recorded history that he is a "flesh-and-blood president, not a comic-book superhero able to dive to the bottom of the sea and plug the hole. I can't suck it up with a straw."

Isn't this "flesh-and-blood president" the same "comic-book superhero" who burst onto the scene blaming Bush for Katrina and predicting his presence would usher in a time "when the rise of the oceans [would begin] to slow and our planet [begin] to heal?"

Now a bungling Barack is forced to come up with yet another marketing ploy. The plan:  Send out political decoys to redirect attention from the Velcro President's glaring failures like jobs, the economy and the increasingly bloody war in Afghanistan. Unfortunately for the President, even Obama's most ardent supporters are admitting after all the hype and unfulfilled promises that "at this stage, it may be late in the game to downsize either the president or his agenda."

Nevertheless, America's vacuous Velcro president does have one marked achievement. Obama has successfully set the stage to be pummeled by the same level of denigration and denunciation as was doled out to a predecessor whom Barack had relentlessly portrayed as inferior.


Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com
Let's face it, Obama promoted himself as the be-all and end-all.  Until recently, whenever Barack talked about Barack, the message was that the world has never and will never see anyone quite like the "one we've been waiting for."

Eighteen months after endless television appearances, a gazillion magazine covers, and hours upon hours of unending rhetoric, aides to the President realize it might be time to "downsize [Obama's] exposure" because the world is quickly concluding that America's messiah has feet of clay.

Apparently, Obama didn't believe he'd fail, or he thought that if he did, he could blame someone else. A stunningly inexperienced Obama swore he could fix everything from a lagging economy to a volatile Middle East. Much to his surprise, Barack realized being champion at playing Battleship and flashing around Monopoly money does not prepare a person to administrate the most powerful office in the world.

In an article entitled "Obama the Velcro President," Peter Nicholas and Janet Hook maintain "If Ronald Reagan was the classic Teflon president, Barack Obama is made of Velcro."

Seems Obama's incompetency is sticking to his Prada suit like lint on Velcro.

The quandary in which Obama finds himself is not surprising, especially after his image was furthered on the premise that he was a messianic gift to the world whose coming would solve every dilemma.

Republican political strategist Eddie Mahe claims Obama's "favorite pronoun is 'I.' When you position yourself as being all things to all people, the ultimate controller and decision maker with the capacity to fix anything, you set yourself up to be blamed when it doesn't get fixed or things happen."

America's marketing creation now finds himself ill-equipped but still "on the hook to repair the Gulf Coast oil spill disaster, stabilize Afghanistan, help fix Greece's ailing economy and do right by Shirley Sherrod, the Agriculture Department official fired as a result of a misleading fragment of videotape."

In two years Obama, an expert at pointing fingers, was a major contributor to the culture of censure.  Try as he might to deflect personal culpability, the nation Obama taught to blame now blames him. 

A pressured and humiliated Obama recently tried to "rip off the Velcro veneer. In a revealing moment during the oil spill crisis, he reminded Americans that his powers aren't ‘limitless.'" Barry modestly apologized to Louisiana residents, admitting for the first and only time in recorded history that he is a "flesh-and-blood president, not a comic-book superhero able to dive to the bottom of the sea and plug the hole. I can't suck it up with a straw."

Isn't this "flesh-and-blood president" the same "comic-book superhero" who burst onto the scene blaming Bush for Katrina and predicting his presence would usher in a time "when the rise of the oceans [would begin] to slow and our planet [begin] to heal?"

Now a bungling Barack is forced to come up with yet another marketing ploy. The plan:  Send out political decoys to redirect attention from the Velcro President's glaring failures like jobs, the economy and the increasingly bloody war in Afghanistan. Unfortunately for the President, even Obama's most ardent supporters are admitting after all the hype and unfulfilled promises that "at this stage, it may be late in the game to downsize either the president or his agenda."

Nevertheless, America's vacuous Velcro president does have one marked achievement. Obama has successfully set the stage to be pummeled by the same level of denigration and denunciation as was doled out to a predecessor whom Barack had relentlessly portrayed as inferior.


Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com