Is Turkey using poison gas on the Kurds?

Ethel C. Fenig
Was Turkey supporting the terrorist flotilla against Israel under the pretext of helping the luxury mall shoppers in Gaza to divert attention from its own ongoing terrorist campaign against the Kurds?

Whatever the reason, Turkey, along with Iraq and Syria, have long brutally suppressed  Kurdish fighters who merely want to establish an independent Kurdish state and live side by side with its neighbors in peace. The Kurds, a distinct ethnic Muslim minority with its own language and culture, reside in these countries with varying degrees of freedom although they long for their own state.


Germany, which knows about gassing people from its own evil history of doing so, has once again accused Turkey of gassing Kurdish fighters according to a report in Spiegel Online. Turkey has ratified the Chemical Weapons Convention which bans chemical weapons.


German experts have confirmed the authenticity of photographs that purport to show PKK fighters killed by chemical weapons. The evidence puts increasing pressure on the Turkish government, which has long been suspected of using such weapons against Kurdish rebels. German politicians are demanding an investigation.

It would be difficult to exceed the horror shown in the photos, which feature burned, maimed and scorched body parts. The victims are scarcely even recognizable as human beings.

Naturally Turkey has denied the accusations.


The Turkish Foreign Ministry has rejected the accusations, according to the Berlin daily newspaper Die Tageszeitung, which reported on the case Thursday. Turkey is a signatory to the Chemical Weapons Convention, and its armed forces do not possess any biological or chemical weapons, the ministry reportedly said.

Now if only the Turks could blame Israel and/or the U.S. the UN would spring into action; the European Union would roar piteously, the Arabs and Muslims, with the help of their leftist enablers would march and riot. But they can't, so this tragedy might be ignored, as is the tragedy unfolding in Darfur and other parts of Africa. The UN makes pitiful squeaks, a few human rights groups speak up--all to no avail.


Indeed the Turks are so confident that their evil will be ignored that they continue to flaunt sanctions against Iran as The Jerusalem Post reports.


Ankara will continue to permit Turkish companies to sell gasoline to Iran, despite US sanctions against fuel exports to Islamic regime, Reuters reported on Wednesday."If the preference of the private sector is to sell these products to Iran, we will help them," said Turkish Energy Minister Taner Yildiz.

Tupras, Turkey's sole oil refiner and gasoline exporter, expressed little fear of retribution from US Treasury officials who have the power to ban sanctions violators from accessing the US banking system or receiving US contracts.

If these accusations against Turkey are proven to be correct will the UN, the European Union, the United States have the will to punish Turkey and put a stop to their horrors? Based on past experience, the answer is alas, no.


Was Turkey supporting the terrorist flotilla against Israel under the pretext of helping the luxury mall shoppers in Gaza to divert attention from its own ongoing terrorist campaign against the Kurds?

Whatever the reason, Turkey, along with Iraq and Syria, have long brutally suppressed  Kurdish fighters who merely want to establish an independent Kurdish state and live side by side with its neighbors in peace. The Kurds, a distinct ethnic Muslim minority with its own language and culture, reside in these countries with varying degrees of freedom although they long for their own state.


Germany, which knows about gassing people from its own evil history of doing so, has once again accused Turkey of gassing Kurdish fighters according to a report in Spiegel Online. Turkey has ratified the Chemical Weapons Convention which bans chemical weapons.


German experts have confirmed the authenticity of photographs that purport to show PKK fighters killed by chemical weapons. The evidence puts increasing pressure on the Turkish government, which has long been suspected of using such weapons against Kurdish rebels. German politicians are demanding an investigation.

It would be difficult to exceed the horror shown in the photos, which feature burned, maimed and scorched body parts. The victims are scarcely even recognizable as human beings.

Naturally Turkey has denied the accusations.


The Turkish Foreign Ministry has rejected the accusations, according to the Berlin daily newspaper Die Tageszeitung, which reported on the case Thursday. Turkey is a signatory to the Chemical Weapons Convention, and its armed forces do not possess any biological or chemical weapons, the ministry reportedly said.

Now if only the Turks could blame Israel and/or the U.S. the UN would spring into action; the European Union would roar piteously, the Arabs and Muslims, with the help of their leftist enablers would march and riot. But they can't, so this tragedy might be ignored, as is the tragedy unfolding in Darfur and other parts of Africa. The UN makes pitiful squeaks, a few human rights groups speak up--all to no avail.


Indeed the Turks are so confident that their evil will be ignored that they continue to flaunt sanctions against Iran as The Jerusalem Post reports.


Ankara will continue to permit Turkish companies to sell gasoline to Iran, despite US sanctions against fuel exports to Islamic regime, Reuters reported on Wednesday.

"If the preference of the private sector is to sell these products to Iran, we will help them," said Turkish Energy Minister Taner Yildiz.

Tupras, Turkey's sole oil refiner and gasoline exporter, expressed little fear of retribution from US Treasury officials who have the power to ban sanctions violators from accessing the US banking system or receiving US contracts.


If these accusations against Turkey are proven to be correct will the UN, the European Union, the United States have the will to punish Turkey and put a stop to their horrors? Based on past experience, the answer is alas, no.