GOP considers resolution to block lame duck session

Rick Moran
Huffington Post's Sam Stein is reporting that the GOP will seek to preempt Democratic attempts to call a lame duck session of Congress in order to pass cap and tax, and perhaps even card check:

House Republicans are going forward with plans to introduce a resolution on Tuesday to prohibit the House of Representatives from assembling during the two-month period following the November elections.A GOP leadership aide confirmed to the Huffington Post that the resolution, authored by Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.) for the purposes of preventing Democrats from passing legislative items during the lame-duck session, would be introduced before the House passes additional Medicaid and teacher funding. The aide argued that comments on Sunday by Carol Browner, the White House's top energy and environmental adviser, suggesting that energy legislation could be considered during the so-called lame duck period, proved that the resolution was pertinent.

Of course, there is little to no chance of the gambit succeeding. The Democrats still have their 40 seat majority and will easily beat back the resolution.

But the GOP is starting to make the case that if they succeed in taking over the House, it would be a slap in the face to voters if dozens of defeated Democratic lawmakers were to vote on issues for which the voters had just soundly rejected them for supporting.

Not that the Democrats care much about such things.



Huffington Post's Sam Stein is reporting that the GOP will seek to preempt Democratic attempts to call a lame duck session of Congress in order to pass cap and tax, and perhaps even card check:

House Republicans are going forward with plans to introduce a resolution on Tuesday to prohibit the House of Representatives from assembling during the two-month period following the November elections.

A GOP leadership aide confirmed to the Huffington Post that the resolution, authored by Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.) for the purposes of preventing Democrats from passing legislative items during the lame-duck session, would be introduced before the House passes additional Medicaid and teacher funding. The aide argued that comments on Sunday by Carol Browner, the White House's top energy and environmental adviser, suggesting that energy legislation could be considered during the so-called lame duck period, proved that the resolution was pertinent.

Of course, there is little to no chance of the gambit succeeding. The Democrats still have their 40 seat majority and will easily beat back the resolution.

But the GOP is starting to make the case that if they succeed in taking over the House, it would be a slap in the face to voters if dozens of defeated Democratic lawmakers were to vote on issues for which the voters had just soundly rejected them for supporting.

Not that the Democrats care much about such things.