Congressional glass house exposed in Roger Clemens case

A New York Post editorial notes that Roger Clemens "should've run for Congress," because if he "had won, say, a House seat and then started lying and cheating...Congress might have respected that."

While Mr. Clemens now has serious legal issues, it is hard to escape the sense of irony arising from a Congress with a sixteen per cent approval rating, and a blind eye to wrongdoing in it's own house, casting stones at anyone else.

Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) lead the steroid hearings involving Mr. Clemens and others, posing pretentiously before the cameras as he lectured some of the most famous names in baseball. 

That would be the same Rep. Henry Waxman who was a driving force behind ObamaCare, passed against the will of the American people, and who, after the bill was signed, summoned "some of the nation's top executives to Capitol Hill" so he could browbeat them for having correctly determined that ObamaCare "will cost their companies hundreds of millions of dollars in health insurance expenses," a show trial demand that Waxman later backed away from.

And that would be the same Congress that promised better health care, lower costs, wider coverage and reduced deficits if only they could "pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it."

The Post goes on to note that this Congress has failed to deal with Rep. Charlie Rangel's (D-NY) alleged tax-cheating and law-breaking and has turned a blind eye to Sen. Chris Dodd's (D-Conn.) sweetheart mortgage deal, among other abuses that have been overlooked.

To which we might add Rep. Barney Frank's 2003 statement with regard to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac that "the more people, in my judgment, exaggerate a threat of safety and soundness, the more people conjure up the possibility of serious financial losses to the Treasury, which I do not see."  That would be the same Fannie and Freddie that are into the taxpayers for at least $148 billion, with the tab expected to go to $389 billion or more.

And of course this is the same Congress that is running trillion dollar deficits as far as the eye can see, so what is a few hundred billion more on the backs of future taxpayers.  Sounds like breach of fiduciary duty to me.

Mr. Clemens was indicted for lying to grandstanding politicians who are systematically fleecing the American public and their progeny of their money, their rights and their country.

As the noted social philosopher Groucho Marx often asked, "who are you going to believe, me or your own lyin' eyes?"

 

 

 

A New York Post editorial notes that Roger Clemens "should've run for Congress," because if he "had won, say, a House seat and then started lying and cheating...Congress might have respected that."

While Mr. Clemens now has serious legal issues, it is hard to escape the sense of irony arising from a Congress with a sixteen per cent approval rating, and a blind eye to wrongdoing in it's own house, casting stones at anyone else.

Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) lead the steroid hearings involving Mr. Clemens and others, posing pretentiously before the cameras as he lectured some of the most famous names in baseball. 

That would be the same Rep. Henry Waxman who was a driving force behind ObamaCare, passed against the will of the American people, and who, after the bill was signed, summoned "some of the nation's top executives to Capitol Hill" so he could browbeat them for having correctly determined that ObamaCare "will cost their companies hundreds of millions of dollars in health insurance expenses," a show trial demand that Waxman later backed away from.

And that would be the same Congress that promised better health care, lower costs, wider coverage and reduced deficits if only they could "pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it."

The Post goes on to note that this Congress has failed to deal with Rep. Charlie Rangel's (D-NY) alleged tax-cheating and law-breaking and has turned a blind eye to Sen. Chris Dodd's (D-Conn.) sweetheart mortgage deal, among other abuses that have been overlooked.

To which we might add Rep. Barney Frank's 2003 statement with regard to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac that "the more people, in my judgment, exaggerate a threat of safety and soundness, the more people conjure up the possibility of serious financial losses to the Treasury, which I do not see."  That would be the same Fannie and Freddie that are into the taxpayers for at least $148 billion, with the tab expected to go to $389 billion or more.

And of course this is the same Congress that is running trillion dollar deficits as far as the eye can see, so what is a few hundred billion more on the backs of future taxpayers.  Sounds like breach of fiduciary duty to me.

Mr. Clemens was indicted for lying to grandstanding politicians who are systematically fleecing the American public and their progeny of their money, their rights and their country.

As the noted social philosopher Groucho Marx often asked, "who are you going to believe, me or your own lyin' eyes?"

 

 

 

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