'Whatever makes them cry, makes us happy'

Peter Wilson
Two men are featured in a FoxNews story on the murder of 74 people in Uganda gathered to watch the World Cup final.  One is Nate Henn, a 25-year old Christian missionary who was killed in the blast:

Henn, 25, was remembered as a tireless and devoted activist by the California-based aid group Invisible Children, which sponsored his work in Uganda.

"From traveling the United States without pay advocating for the freedom of abducted child soldiers ... to raising thousands of dollars to put war-affected Ugandan students in school, Nate lived a life that demanded explanation," the group said in a statement on its website.

"He sacrificed his comfort to live in the humble service of God and of a better world, and his is a life to be emulated."

The second man is suspected of ordering the murder of Mr. Henn and the 73 others:

Sheik Yusuf Sheik Issa, an al-Shabab commander, told The Associated Press early Monday that he was happy with the attacks in Uganda but refused to confirm or deny that al-Shabab was responsible.

"Uganda is one of our enemies. Whatever makes them cry, makes us happy. May Allah's anger be upon those who are against us," Sheik said.

It's not often that good and evil are portrayed with such clarity.
Two men are featured in a FoxNews story on the murder of 74 people in Uganda gathered to watch the World Cup final.  One is Nate Henn, a 25-year old Christian missionary who was killed in the blast:

Henn, 25, was remembered as a tireless and devoted activist by the California-based aid group Invisible Children, which sponsored his work in Uganda.

"From traveling the United States without pay advocating for the freedom of abducted child soldiers ... to raising thousands of dollars to put war-affected Ugandan students in school, Nate lived a life that demanded explanation," the group said in a statement on its website.

"He sacrificed his comfort to live in the humble service of God and of a better world, and his is a life to be emulated."

The second man is suspected of ordering the murder of Mr. Henn and the 73 others:

Sheik Yusuf Sheik Issa, an al-Shabab commander, told The Associated Press early Monday that he was happy with the attacks in Uganda but refused to confirm or deny that al-Shabab was responsible.

"Uganda is one of our enemies. Whatever makes them cry, makes us happy. May Allah's anger be upon those who are against us," Sheik said.

It's not often that good and evil are portrayed with such clarity.