In defense of Eric Holder?

There got your attention, didn't we?America - at least Americans who keep up on current events (and not the "sanitized" and "censored" versions delivered up by the usual suspects) - know that Eric Holder's Department of Justice has adopted race-based policies as its guiding principle. But there are signs that it did not all start with Holder.

From the National Review

The village of Port Chester, N.Y., is governed by a six-member board of trustees. Elections for the board were conducted on an at-large system - every voter looking at the same list of candidates - until 2006, when the Justice Department sued Port Chester under the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

But not enough Hispanics were being elected by the citizenry of Port Chester, so the diversity police at the DOJ went into action. In their view , the wrong people were being elected - despite the fact that no citizen had been barred from voting nor had unjust qualifications imposed on them. But Port Chester is 50% Hispanic so the absence of Hispanic representation on the board of trustees angered lawyers at the DOJ. Defense and resistance was "futile".

Town officials pointed out, with supporting data, that some large portion of their Hispanic population was ineligible to vote, not being citizens, and that voter turnout among the rest was low. Resistance was of course futile. A new, more complex voting system was imposed, along with the notoriously leaky "early voting" rule, and a Hispanic trustee has now been elected.

Engineering the outcome of elections-as was done recently by Holder's DOJ in Kinston, North Carolina and is being done increasingly throughout the country under the iron fist of the DOJ did not start with Eric Holder. Clearly, there are some attorneys at the Department who have favored this type of control before the reins were turned over to Eric Holder.

He, and his boss, Barack Obama, have just stepped up the pace-exponentially.


There got your attention, didn't we?

America - at least Americans who keep up on current events (and not the "sanitized" and "censored" versions delivered up by the usual suspects) - know that Eric Holder's Department of Justice has adopted race-based policies as its guiding principle. But there are signs that it did not all start with Holder.

From the National Review

The village of Port Chester, N.Y., is governed by a six-member board of trustees. Elections for the board were conducted on an at-large system - every voter looking at the same list of candidates - until 2006, when the Justice Department sued Port Chester under the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

But not enough Hispanics were being elected by the citizenry of Port Chester, so the diversity police at the DOJ went into action. In their view , the wrong people were being elected - despite the fact that no citizen had been barred from voting nor had unjust qualifications imposed on them. But Port Chester is 50% Hispanic so the absence of Hispanic representation on the board of trustees angered lawyers at the DOJ. Defense and resistance was "futile".

Town officials pointed out, with supporting data, that some large portion of their Hispanic population was ineligible to vote, not being citizens, and that voter turnout among the rest was low. Resistance was of course futile. A new, more complex voting system was imposed, along with the notoriously leaky "early voting" rule, and a Hispanic trustee has now been elected.

Engineering the outcome of elections-as was done recently by Holder's DOJ in Kinston, North Carolina and is being done increasingly throughout the country under the iron fist of the DOJ did not start with Eric Holder. Clearly, there are some attorneys at the Department who have favored this type of control before the reins were turned over to Eric Holder.

He, and his boss, Barack Obama, have just stepped up the pace-exponentially.


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